November 24, 2006 2:19 PM PST

Video of teacher rant gets students in trouble

A school in Quebec, Canada, has banned personal electronic devices in the classroom after students videotaped a teacher yelling at a student and the footage ended up on YouTube.

Two 13-year-old girls have been suspended for their involvement in the incident at Ecole Secondaire Mont-Bleu, according to the CBC report. And the teacher has taken a stress leave from work.

The teacher was purposely provoked by one of the girls into yelling at her while the other girl secretly taped the scene, the CBC reported. Exactly what kind of device was used to record the event was undisclosed.

YouTube, by far the largest of the sites hosting user-submitted video, is quickly becoming a favorite venue for those wishing to expose wrongdoing. Proponents argue that online video can help hold people accountable. But the mushrooming popularity of these sites, coupled with the prevalence of video-equipped cell phones, has also raised concerns about misinterpreted context and the risk of ruined reputations.

In one of the more recent examples of the far reach of video sites, comedian Michael Richards, best-known for his work in the long-running TV comedy series Seinfeld, was performing a standup routine in Los Angeles last week when a member of the audience filmed him spewing racial epithets at hecklers. The video was watched more than 470,000 times on YouTube.

In this case, Richards admitted making the statements and has publicly apologized.

Earlier this month, an investigation was launched into two members of the Los Angeles Police Department after they were videotaped punching a man repeatedly in the face. The probe into the incident began only after the clip appeared on YouTube, igniting public outcry.

In contrast to the Richards' case, LAPD officials have defended the officers by noting that that the video may not have told the whole story. The clip did not include what occurred between the suspect and officers before the police used force.

In the case of the Canadian teacher, officials from the school district have sided with the man and say they hope he decides to return to work, according to the CBC report. Colleagues say the teacher has more than three decades of experience and has instructed special classes for students with discipline problems.

"The teacher will be the master of his class--a closed class and confidential," Abdu Mansouri, a spokesman for the region's teachers' union, told the CBC.

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32 comments

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30 Decades???
>Colleagues say the teacher has more than 30 decades of
>experience and has instructed special classes for students with
>discipline problems.

My god! A three hundred-year-old man! And he's been teaching all
that time? No <wonder> he needs some leave time!
Posted by fshepinc (41 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Way to go CNet!
Yet another awesome and accurate news story! Is your editor on vacation, too?
Posted by `WarpKat (275 comments )
Link Flag
10 years
A decade is 10 years not 100 (:
Posted by sciss0rz (2 comments )
Link Flag
10 years
A decade is 10 years people. Not 100.
Posted by sciss0rz (2 comments )
Link Flag
Yes, and 30 x 10 = 300
maybe this teacher should have yelled at you so you learned basic math.
Posted by mb_96_net (15 comments )
Reply Link Flag
No wonder...
I doubt if I'd have much patience if I'd been dealing with unruly students for 300 years.
Posted by be1498 (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Thanks for the catch...
...eagle-eyes readers. The typo has been fixed.
Posted by LeslieKatz (143 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Don't get it?
Police get taped alledgedly physically abusing on the job and are criticized.
Standup comedian gets taped alledgedly verbally abusing on the job and is criticized and sued by the alledgedly abused.
Canadian Teacher is taped on the job allegedly verbally abusing on the job and the alledgedly abused gets in trouble.
Posted by 1captjack (3 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Try reading the 2nd paragraph
"The teacher was purposely provoked by one of the girls into yelling at her while the other girl secretly taped the scene, the CBC reported"

That's why they got into trouble.
Posted by pmfjoe (196 comments )
Link Flag
Yeah, exactly.
In the 1970's in Quebec, there was such a shortage of teachers that hiring practices were not particularly selective. Now you would expect to find better quality candidates. Even though the students set up the incident, it's likely that it still illustrates a pattern of behavior on the part of the teacher. The teacher's union will back up the teacher regardless of the circumstances; I have never heard of an incident in which the union called for the discipline of a teacher.
Posted by hugh23920 (12 comments )
Link Flag
Don't instigate then cry victim
It may not be right but not every person that gets abused by the cops are innocent, many ask for it in a large in your face way. Michael Richards bigoted outburst didn't happen in a vacuum yet the "Black Community" felt it was justified to behave racially in return. These kids were little brats who went out of their way to set up the teacher, disrupt the class and make their 15 seconds of fame on You Tube. Everybody wants to be a victim, rarely is anyone stand-up enough to take responsibility for their sh@t.
Posted by aqvarivs (38 comments )
Link Flag
Because
I would be willing to bet that at least a couple of other students in
the class came forward with the truth.
Posted by Gromit801 (393 comments )
Link Flag
Sounds like a script?
Sounds like a script from a Paris and Nicky non reality show!

But hey, if I was either parent of these two wannabee filmakers, I would be so embarassed by their lack of ability to think before you leap anti social behavioral attitude and willing to upset and deliberately distract other students who are there to learn in this particular class, the punishment to be fair , should go far beyond the school suspension period, and should include weekend voluntary work at the local food kicthen for the needy and underprivileged for a minimum period not less than twelve months, and a similar term at the local McChucks or Col Broilers, for the customer service training on the other side of the counter!

They may or may not get the message, but then again with this activity, it will give them the advantage for future full time employent after graduation, for they do not appear to be willing and attentive students in the classroom at this point in time!

Choices!
Posted by heystoopid (691 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Unbelievable amounts of videos like this...
<a class="jive-link-external" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mnBKDV_tCM&#38;NR" target="_newWindow">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mnBKDV_tCM&#38;NR</a>
Posted by ondeathsdoorstep (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
Children Lie
Maybe you've never been a teacher, but children lie. They can be
as mean and nasty (if not more so) than adults. Yes, there are
some bad apple teachers out there, but in this case I would look at
the full picture and see if there is a pattern. Over 30 years it's hard
NOT to find some pattern. For some reason when it comes to
accusations against teachers it's guily until proven innocent.
Posted by (11 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Teachers lie as well.
So do the administration. The police can be more than a bit truth challenged as well. Lets see cameras in all the rooms all the time. When something like this happens, see the event from start to finish.
Posted by ralfthedog (1589 comments )
Link Flag
As if teachers don't have to put up with enough as is...
This is another classic example of how kids today are just out of control. Teacher's are one of the most overworked, underpaid people we have. Then you have brats like this who want to stress them out even more.

It's time to stop this "protect the kids" nonsense and go back to how I was raised up -- you act up and you get the paddle and you get punished. It's just ridiculous what kids today get away with. If I would have done something like that when I went to school I would have paid the price dearly once dad found out.
Posted by rstinnett (41 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Agreed to a point, but...
...as a former teacher, I've found that there are plenty of tools at hand to use in such a situation:

* Assign extra homework (and I mean a crushing TON of it) to the whole classroom in that class period, "...courtesy of --insert troublemaker's name here--", and that it will affect one's final grade. Peer pressure (or rather, 29 really pissed-off students glaring at the one brat and concocting appropriate revenge) is a highly effective tool to shut down disruption in the classroom.

* Include classroom behavior as a portion of the final grade if the kids are young enough.

* Send 'em downstairs to the office, or out of the classroom if necessary.

* Recommend the extremely disruptive older kid for 'special education', right in front of the class (but say it with a heavy tone of concern). Not to insult them, mind, but to mention that if they cannot seem to get a handle on their behavior, then maybe they need to be sent to the office and recommended for the classes that (in the mind of all the other students) equate with having to 'ride on the short bus', so to speak. It'll knock down their reputation among their peers immensely, and they tend to get the idea very quickly that if they don't behave, their rep among all the other schoolkids will be destroyed. It'll also rattle their parents if the parents are the college-hungry type. And of course, you can always point to the kid's behavior as perfect justification (the acronym "ADD" and the phrase "bi-polar" tend to carry a lot of weight in such discussions, ne?) Of course, this will depend on the kid in question.

* Of course, sometimes you may just want to take the kid aside after class and ask them what's going on and if there's anything you can do to help.

There are many more of course, but each depends on situation, and each can be handled according to the kid, the level of disruption, and your own goals for correction.

Meh - no real need to break out the paddle, IMHO. Save that for the rare violent types.

/P
Posted by Penguinisto (5042 comments )
Link Flag
Agreed, but not ab't paddling...
..as a former teacher, I've found that there are plenty of tools at hand to use in such a situation:

* Assign extra homework (and I mean a crushing TON of it) to the whole classroom in that class period, "...courtesy of --insert troublemaker's name here--", and that it will affect one's final grade. Peer pressure (or rather, 29 really pissed-off students glaring at the one brat and concocting appropriate revenge) is a highly effective tool to shut down disruption in the classroom.

* Include classroom behavior as a portion of the final grade if the kids are young enough.

* Send 'em downstairs to the office, or out of the classroom if necessary.

* Recommend the extremely disruptive older kid for 'special education', right in front of the class (but say it with a heavy tone of concern). Not to insult them, mind, but to mention that if they cannot seem to get a handle on their behavior, then maybe they need to be sent to the office and recommended for the classes that (in the mind of all the other students) equate with having to 'ride on the short bus', so to speak. It'll knock down their reputation among their peers immensely, and they tend to get the idea very quickly that if they don't behave, their rep among all the other schoolkids will be destroyed. It'll also rattle their parents if the parents are the college-hungry type. And of course, you can always point to the kid's behavior as perfect justification (the acronym "ADD" and the phrase "bi-polar" tend to carry a lot of weight in such discussions, ne?) Of course, this will depend on the kid in question.

* Of course, sometimes you may just want to take the kid aside after class and ask them what's going on and if there's anything you can do to help.

There are many more of course, but each depends on situation, and each can be handled according to the kid, the level of disruption, and your own goals for correction.

Meh - no real need to break out the paddle, IMHO. Save that for the rare violent types.

/P
Posted by Penguinisto (5042 comments )
Link Flag
Aren't your children fortunate
It must be very nurturing to grow up with a parent who refers to children as 'brats' and thinks that children should be beaten. It's attitudes like that that lead to many of the discipline problems that teachers face. And it's clear that educational practices in your time didn't succeed in teaching you to write proper English. I would have expected better from someone with a fourth-grade education.

I don't agree that teachers are overworked or underpaid. Yes, it can be difficult dealing with children, who are going through various stages of emotional and intellectual development. But teaching also has its benefits, especially when compared with other jobs or professions that provide equivalent salaries. Teaching is a union job that can be acquired with an undergrad degree, and that provides great benefits and months of vacation time every year. It's done indoors, out of the elements. There is (generally) no physical danger involved. It doesn't (generally) involve life or death decisions. There is almost never a requirement to work late hours (i.e. beyond midnight). Teachers aren't on call nights or weekends.
Posted by hugh23920 (12 comments )
Link Flag
Yeah, and?
30 decades. 30x10=300 Years.
Posted by Michael Bird (14 comments )
Reply Link Flag
What a crock!
Here in the United States, claiming that a professional was 'provoked' into abusing a student is meaningless.

If you allow yourself to be provoked, you are a bad teacher. You should be in control of the class and your students.

So we have a tape of the teacher being abused, and we have the unconfirmed excuse that a 'provocation' occurred.... wow, some people are clueless.

Glad these students video taped their teacher...hope it happens again and this person gets busted once and for all.
Posted by Dmitry1969 (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Here in the United States?
I'm sure not every American is of the same opinion and thinks it's meaningless. But to the extent what you say is true, it's true for pretty much everywhere else in the world, including Quebec and the rest of Canada.
Posted by jjd-van (8 comments )
Link Flag
Limited Power
Teachers have limited power over students. They are also human and like most humans they can be provoked into anger.

Of course I don't know the whole story, but "IF" the teacher has a history of yelling or "loosing it" with their class then I do believe the teacher should find another line of work. Of course if you have students who are daily pushing the teachers buttons to provoke a heated response then the students should be punished and the parents should be slapped.

It's not all fun and games for teachers.
Posted by System Tyrant (1453 comments )
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