February 23, 2010 2:33 PM PST

Toyota official says recall may not fully solve safety problem

An executive told a House committee Toyota's recall might "not totally" solve the problem of unintended acceleration in its vehicles.
(From The New York Times)

The story "Toyota official says recall may not fully solve safety problem" published February 23, 2010 at 2:33 PM is no longer available on CNET News.

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"We lost sight of our customers."

"We outgrew our engineering resource,"

We put profits ahead of safety, like every good capitalist.
Posted by clamenza (401 comments )
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I suppose you'd rather be driving a Yugo then.
Posted by Endbringer (344 comments )
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Cue in Toyota fanboys.

Well American car companies have recalls as well. Let me already post a rebuttal.

American car companies don't deny the problem for years and when they do post a recall they do a solution that actually solves the problem.

Toyota has so far blamed floor mats now accelerators and still don't know what the hell the problem is.
Posted by monkeyfun14 (3256 comments )
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Eh....really? How long have you been buying cars? 2 years?
Posted by ckurowic (447 comments )
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And GM still doesn't know how to design a decent car. What was your point? That this is easy?
Posted by Renegade Knight (13748 comments )
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BS, American car makers are exactly the same way about problems with their cars.

Lets see, there was the Pinto gas tank problem that was known before the first car ever shipped, according to insiders during the government investigation.

There was the trucks with gas tanks that fell out, but were still made that way for years afterwards.

Then there was the citation losing control under panic stops that was outed on 60 minutes or 20/20 whichever it was and denied completely even though a testing firm bought 20 used cars around the country at random and it happed on 20 out of 20 cars in testing (several having the rear axel drop out of the car under hard breaking) which started a government investigation that was moved to the back burner in the early 80's because suddenly a huge Audi 5000 unintended acceleration case came forward at the same time

That was a good one there, every news agency in the country blew that story up to ten times the press coverage than the gave the citation problem, when no one was ever able to get a Audi 5000 to recreate the event even once in testing. 60 Minutes and several other news agencies were even busted for falsifying the story. 60 minutes did a piece where they rigged an Audi 5000 to accelerate in "testing" by modifiying the car intentionally. That was a planned brand assassination if there ever was one to take the heat off the other car makers having problems at the time. The NHSTA investigated for almost 5 years and with no cars ever being "fixed" in any way because they could not find a problem in the frist place, all reported cases stopped coming in right after the story was in the headlines.

Seems to me Toyota simply fell in with the pack now.
Posted by dennisheadley (593 comments )
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Why do I get the feeling I'm about to experience the same odor as when mowing the lawn and running over a big pile of dog poop?
Posted by Seaspray0 (9714 comments )
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Don't you think it was blown out of proportion? How many actual cases have been reported and how many accidents actually happened? All articles on this subject, including this one, conveniently omit number of actual cases. According to Wikipedia, there was about 130 complains and only a few actual accidents - numbers are so small that they represent only potential, hypothetical problem. And, obviosly, it was difficult to identify problem that occurs in one out million cars and is difficult to replicate.
Could somebody clarify this issue with numbers?
Posted by SergeM256 (2034 comments )
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Blown out of proportion until it's YOUR loved one who dies behind the wheels of one of their products. Don't know the numbers, but now, even one is too many when Toyota admits it placed growth and profits ahead of consumer safety.
Posted by mike.gw (942 comments )
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This is a risk we are willing to take for the privilege of driving. Small number of fatalities is expected - about 34,000 in a year in the US. In about 6% of traffic collision vehicle condition is a primary (2%) or contributing (4%) factor. I don't have exact numbers, but it must be about 2,000 of fatalities related to mechanical problems.
Posted by SergeM256 (2034 comments )
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In reply to mike.gw:
See http://www.edmunds.com/help/about/press/161506/article.html and http://www.caranddriver.com/news/car/10q1/toyota_recall_scandal_media_circus_and_stupid_drivers-editorial.
Posted by cwerdna (37 comments )
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In reply to mike.gw:
See http://www.edmunds.com/help/about/press/161506/article.html and http://www.caranddriver.com/news/car/10q1/toyota_recall_scandal_media_circus_and_stupid_drivers-editorial.

For those who are curious to see vehicle fatality numbers, see http://www-fars.nhtsa.dot.gov/Main/index.aspx.
Posted by cwerdna (37 comments )
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It could even be not computer/software/firmware issue, but thyristor (latch) effect in the throttle driver IC, which might happen because of momentary voltage spike in the output. In this case, brake override will do nothing.
Posted by alegr (1590 comments )
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"...caused by pressing on the brakes while the tires were spinning." Isn't that the normal way to stop them from spinning so the car slows down and comes to a halt? Maybe the two red lights that illuminated at the rear of the car when I pressed the brake pedal were the problem? Where's that company technician?
Posted by Seaspray0 (9714 comments )
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What happened to the good old days when he would have committed harakiri to save face?
Posted by darthstupid (273 comments )
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Americans, you kill me. Pride, guts and glory and all that.

Toyota is a great company, who admitted putting profits ahead of safety, committed to fixing them, and is trying to find a problem to a 1 in a million+ problem. Their CEO comes out and states their pursuit of growth caused these issues, and takes full responsibility, and what does "darthstupid" respond with in his comment, something about harakiri to save face? Unreal.

Never mind, just keep subsidizing GM with your tax dollars, I hear it's going well.
Posted by quig451 (1 comment )
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All corporations are greedy self-serving (insert choice words here). They only are in it for the money and to fill their CEO and board members pockets. Their workers are nothing more than cogs that are expendable. Until, there are restrictions imposed on their influence (this has to be worldwide), The Toyota situation is just a continuation of more and more examples that are coming to the forefront.
Posted by weegg (849 comments )
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Does no one see a conflict of interest when the US government, which owns Obama Motors, pulls in (O)GM's largest competitor into a Congressional hearing? This fascist economic model our "leaders" are promoting and implementing is going to ruin us.
Posted by Endbringer (344 comments )
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What the hell are you talking about?
Posted by monkeyfun14 (3256 comments )
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I think it all boils down to a lack of fundamental ethics in everything we do today with a particular focus on maximizing short term profit regardless of the long term consequences to society. It isn't about us, and don't be fooled into believing the pols in Washington really care all that much about us either. It's just another opportunity for a bunch of powerful guys to grandstand, and look like they are doing something. Toyota dropped the ball particularly in regards to disclosure and got caught - do you think they are that much worse than any other manufacturer of any equally complex product?

As an R&D eng in the electronics industry, mistakes and oversights happen (design, component, manufacturing related issues) all the time, it is how you handle them when your defective product ends up in the hands of consumers that determines whether you are a hero or not. Zero defects is a laudible goal, but not entirely achievable in practice - it's what you do when you find a problem that counts. Toyota badly bungled this..

There is no way to make any automobile 100% (or any potentially dangerous device) immune to life threatening malfunctions, but you can make them statistically insignificant - but that doesn't mean that there won't be incidents either. I just wonder how far out of the noise these issues with Toyota vehicles are and how they compare to other brands in regards to these sorts of issues, I wouldn't be surprised if there wasn't much difference.
Posted by KevinK (207 comments )
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