February 7, 2002 12:40 PM PST

Sun details plans for Linux servers

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Sun Microsystems said Thursday that it would sell general-purpose Linux servers, a dramatic departure for the company that for years has advocated the use of its own Solaris operating system.

The company, which also announced a big push into the storage market during its analyst conference in San Francisco this week, has three prongs to its Linux plans.

Sun said it will ship a full version of the Linux operating system. It will also expand its line of Cobalt Linux appliances along with a line of low-end, general-purpose Linux/x86-based systems.

The company added it will "aggressively participate in the Linux community," offering key components of its Solaris operating system for free.

The company said more concrete announcements about pricing and product releases will be made in the second calendar quarter of this year.

"This is great for the development community," Chief Operating Officer Ed Zander said on a conference call Thursday. "It brings Solaris developers, which are 300,000, together with Linux developers."

Sun has been participating in numerous open-source projects, lending a hand with the Apache Web server, the Gnome graphical interface software and the Li18nux Linux internationalization effort. Sun also has contributed to the open-source community software such as its StarOffice package that competes with Microsoft Office and Sun's NFS software for sharing files over networks.

But Sun also has alienated some open-source fans by complicating the way it shared source code for Java, Jini and Solaris.

While the company played up expectations that the new Linux developments should increase the market for Solaris, it also emphasized that it will strengthen its move toward open-source environments in general.

Ed Zander "This is an alternative to anyone that wants an alternative to the Microsoft or the IBM environment, which is very controlling," Zander said. IBM also has been moving toward the open-source environment; it announced a new Linux-only mainframe in January.

Red Hat, the leading seller of Linux software and services, hailed Sun's move.

"This is a great day for Linux," said Mike Evans, vice president of business development at Red Hat, in a statement. "Sun is to be congratulated for changing their stance." Evans also said Red Hat looks forward to the contributions Sun will make to the programming community.

Red Hat considers Unix servers from Sun and others its prime customer target.

Sun said on its conference call that its move toward Linux is "bold." But management, which historically has treated Linux as a runner-up to the company's own Solaris, was defensive when analysts questioned whether Sun was tacitly acknowledging that Linux has some superior qualities.

"This is a way to bring Linux applications into the Solaris environment," Zander said. Sun said that although it now lets Linux applications run with Solaris, it has no plans to enable Solaris applications to run with Linux.

"When a Linux application runs in Solaris, you get superior scalability that comes with Solaris," Zander said, noting that Sun will soon be 20 years old, and Linux was developed over time, "modeling after Solaris."

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SUN MICROSYSTEM IS MAKING A BIG TIME MISTAKE
Sun Microsystem has been pretty successful selling its solaris operating system based servers although that has not made a difference to its stock price that hovers in $3 to $4 price range. If it is going to develop servers based upon different operating engines it will get disttracted from making improvements to it Solaris operating System based servers. But if the disattarction is in its cards it should start developing Servers based upon Windows XP operating Engine although I'm not a fan of windows. The fact is that Windows XP or Windows 2000 is the most widely used Operating engine. Linux, Opera and Mozilla have not made a dent to the sales of the personal Computers using Windows operating engines. As long as Windows is the operating engine preferred by the public there is no sense as to the use of different operating engine in any servers developed by Sun or IBM.

There is a every reason to develop an internet service that is server oriented rather than being Client oriented as discussed at
<a class="jive-link-external" href="http://www.newerawisp.blogspot.com/" target="_newWindow">http://www.newerawisp.blogspot.com/</a>
The reasons are discussed therein. That does not affect the fortune of Sun Microsystem or IBM servers. What affects the fortunes of Sun Microsystem is the operating engines used by the personal Computers being sold at this time. If and when the server side browser is developed it will no longer be necessary for people to use the personal computers. That will be the Time for Sun to use any operating Engine it deems fit.

At the present time the only reason Sun Microsystem is using Linux operaing engine in its servers is to hurt the business of Windows operating engines. Sun Microsystem will fail miserably if it pursues this path.
Posted by newerawisp (47 comments )
Reply Link Flag
SUN MICROSYSTEM IS MAKING A BIG TIME MISTAKE
Sun Microsystem has been pretty successful selling its solaris operating system based servers although that has not made a difference to its stock price that hovers in $3 to $4 price range. If it is going to develop servers based upon different operating engines it will get disttracted from making improvements to it Solaris operating System based servers. But if the disattarction is in its cards it should start developing Servers based upon Windows XP operating Engine although I'm not a fan of windows. The fact is that Windows XP or Windows 2000 is the most widely used Operating engine. Linux, Opera and Mozilla have not made a dent to the sales of the personal Computers using Windows operating engines. As long as Windows is the operating engine preferred by the public there is no sense as to the use of different operating engine in any servers developed by Sun or IBM.

There is a every reason to develop an internet service that is server oriented rather than being Client oriented as discussed at
<a class="jive-link-external" href="http://www.newerawisp.blogspot.com/" target="_newWindow">http://www.newerawisp.blogspot.com/</a>
The reasons are discussed therein. That does not affect the fortune of Sun Microsystem or IBM servers. What affects the fortunes of Sun Microsystem is the operating engines used by the personal Computers being sold at this time. If and when the server side browser is developed it will no longer be necessary for people to use the personal computers. That will be the Time for Sun to use any operating Engine it deems fit.

At the present time the only reason Sun Microsystem is using Linux operaing engine in its servers is to hurt the business of Windows operating engines. Sun Microsystem will fail miserably if it pursues this path.
Posted by newerawisp (47 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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