September 11, 2007 4:00 AM PDT

Is free music too expensive for SpiralFrog?

Miniscule revenues, no users and plenty of debt haven't stopped SpiralFrog executives from "studying options" for listing the company on a stock exchange.

The company made a splash a year ago by promising to offer consumers free advertising-supported music. But getting that business off the ground has proved a challenge to a revolving executive team led by Joe Mohen, SpiralFrog's founder and chairman. Now faced with hard-to-fulfill commitments to investors, Mohen isn't ruling out going public, despite his company's still-embryonic situation.

Two weeks ago, privately held SpiralFrog made available a 10SB form it filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. That's a form that is usually reserved for small companies that aren't financially strong enough, or operationally ready, to file for an initial public offering. Some of these companies, which are looking to bring in money with the sale of their stock, will try other means, such as merging with a publicly traded company before they hit the public market, said Mike Sullivan, a securities attorney with Howard Rice Nemerovski Canady Falk & Rabkin. Sullivan is not associated with SpiralFrog.

In the case of SpiralFrog, the 10SB form is designed to satisfy an agreement with a group of mostly British backers who required as a condition of investment that the company trade on a public exchange in either the United States of the United Kingdom by now, Mohen said. In an interview with CNET News.com last week, he said that with the filing, SpiralFrog is "publicly reported" and that should be enough to satisfy investors. "We do believe we have fulfilled our commitments," Mohen said.

"We have customers, we have revenues and we're about to have users. We are confident from our cash flow from operations and other steps we've taken that we will be successful."
--Joe Mohen, SpiralFrog founder and chairman

Never say never, but it's hard to imagine SpiralFrog will attempt an IPO that would most likely be panned by Wall Street. Without a live Web site (it's expected to go live in another few weeks), the company had generated just $3,102 in revenue as of June 30, according to the documents. Nonetheless, the filing with the SEC goes a long way toward illustrating the predicament the 4-year-old company (which was in stealth mode for nearly three years) is facing as it tries to appease investors and creditors.

In August 2006, SpiralFrog leaped on to the music scene with a promise of free songs and a signed contract to license music from Universal Music Group, the largest of the top four record labels. SpiralFrog hoped to draw music fans away from illegal file-sharing sites by offering free music supported by advertisers.

Since then, SpiralFrog has seen its original executive team walk out and is eight months behind a self-imposed deadline for launching a Web site.

Providing free music has proved to be a pricey proposition for the New York company. To secure its licensing deal with Universal, SpiralFrog initially paid $2.2 million and since had to pony up an additional $1 million. Since signing that agreement with Universal, SpiralFrog has failed to land another major label. A spokesman for Universal declined to comment.

One music industry executive familiar with ad-supported services said SpiralFrog likely overpaid. "I haven't heard of anybody paying the record companies those kinds of fees in a long time," the executive said. "Over the past couple of years, the labels were desperate to distribute their content through different services and were willing to reduce prices."

But Hank Barry, an attorney with Howard Rice Nemerovski Canady Falk & Rabkin and a former venture capitalist and CEO of Napster, says the Universal deal is a pretty good one for SpiralFrog because Universal isn't charging SpiralFrog each time a song is downloaded.

"There doesn't seem to be a floor on per-download fees," Barry said. "Rather, (Universal) is taking 50 percent of 'gross receipts' related to its sound recordings. And there is an additional fee for publishing rights. This is very good for SpiralFrog, because they can just get what they can get in the ad market and pay half of that to (Universal), rather than having a (per-play fee) of some large number."

According to a copy of the contract that was included in SpiralFrog's SEC documents, SpiralFrog can recoup some of the $3.3 million it paid as an advance when it makes $6.6 million in advertising.

First, of course, SpiralFrog has to start providing music. The start-up has burned through most of its cash--having already spent more than $4 million this year--and has begun funding operations by borrowing money, according to the filings. Things got tight enough last March to prompt SpiralFrog to borrow $63,000 from an executive. The company was then forced to fork over an additional $3,300 when it was late paying him back, according to the documents.

The financial crunch didn't stop executives from drawing big paychecks, however. Last year, as SpiralFrog was on its way to losing $6.7 million, Mohen received more than $422,000 in "consulting fees" and back pay, according to the filings. Robin Kent, the company's former CEO, earned $340,000 for the year--all in salary. According to Kent, all the members of the seven-person management team agreed to forgo deferred compensation except for Mohen and the company's secretary. Mohen strongly disputes this. He said that he and the company's secretary were the only ones entitled to receive back pay.

Mohen defends the salaries. "It's not uncommon for a company to pay people before a company launches," Mohen said, adding that the upcoming launch of the Web site might ease financial burdens. "We're prepared now to launch the service and we have advertisers lined up ready for launch. We will be earning material revenue from operations as we go forward."

CONTINUED: A skeptical music industry…
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4 comments

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Downward Spiral
The idea seems like a bad one. But if it does have a chance, they
certainly are blowing it with their site. They've been working on it
for how long now? Yet there isn't even a way for a user to discover
what the service is without signing up first. I mean, really, if you
want to attract users for your service, putting some information for
them up on your site might be a good place to start. Bad idea +
bad execution = Spiral Frog won't be around for long.
Posted by jd29 (14 comments )
Reply Link Flag
These investors
Are idiots. There are a lot of interesting startups run by honest people who wouldn't even think of paying themselves anywhere close to $400K+ while their company careened towards death. Some of those would lost your investment money to, but they'd at least try to get their biz going; others would actually do well and give you good returns. Whomever gave money to this thing (four years: no website!?) deserves to lose all of it.
Posted by michaelo1966 (159 comments )
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deja vu
wow they have the business plan from the 2000 boom.

Me: What's you business plan?

Them: I sell dollars for 75 cents!

Me: How do you make money on this?

Them: I make it up in volume!
Posted by echeola (12 comments )
Reply Link Flag
COOKIES
useless POS website seems to want to install cookies - so let it, Cnet's ccokies seem to work. Why not theirs? Obviously not paying enough in consulting fees. Where is Anderson consulting when you need them?
Posted by gggg sssss (2285 comments )
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