August 23, 2005 11:00 PM PDT

For Intel, home is where the Viiv is

The word for homes, according to Intel, is Viiv.

The Santa Clara, Calif.-based chip giant is expected to unfurl a new branding campaign on Wednesday aimed at making it easier for home consumers to identify PCs geared for recording TV shows or playing music. The campaign will revolve around PCs with the Viiv sticker.

The Viiv sticker, similar in function to the Centrino sticker found on Intel-powered mobile notebooks, will essentially inform consumers that the processor, chipset and software found on a particular PC have been tested together and can perform distinct tasks, such as recording TV shows, without much of a hitch, according to sources.

The difference is that the Centrino sticker indicates that the PC in question includes an Intel processor, an Intel chipset and a Wi-Fi receiver tested and/or manufactured by the company. The Viiv sticker indicates that the PC contains an Intel processor, a chipset and a software stack for performing specific functions. In the past year or so, Intel has increasingly promoted its own homegrown software for entertainment tasks.

Historically, in this sort of marketing campaign, Intel gives marketing funds to computer makers that put the appropriate sticker on their PCs.

Ideally, the company hopes to use the campaign to get consumers to start considering PCs as a central part of their home entertainment experience, said Eric Kim, Intel's chief marketing officer. Kim laid out the general outlines of the strategy, but did not state the brand. Other sources close to the company, however, did state the name.

10 comments

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Perhaps as a sales tool....
... but almost immediately thereafter, the user can easily screw up
the best pre-configuration. And any PC can meet the VIIV standard
with just a small bit of hardware and software. Seems like this is a
next to useless label developed simply to push sales, not PC
quality.

But then, what's new?????
Posted by Earl Benser (4310 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Perhaps as a sales tool....
... but almost immediately thereafter, the user can easily screw up
the best pre-configuration. And any PC can meet the VIIV standard
with just a small bit of hardware and software. Seems like this is a
next to useless label developed simply to push sales, not PC
quality.

But then, what's new?????
Posted by Earl Benser (4310 comments )
Reply Link Flag
VIIV = 64?
I already read all the mombo-jumbo about how nice these r going to be... but the name... am i the only one who have noticed its a roman 64 number? is this thing a 64bit processor? or what?
Posted by (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Actually, it isn't 64.
VIIV is not a valid Roman numeral at all-- it's gibberish!

LXIV

That's 64 in Roman Numerals.
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
VIIV = 64?
I already read all the mombo-jumbo about how nice these r going to be... but the name... am i the only one who have noticed its a roman 64 number? is this thing a 64bit processor? or what?
Posted by (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Actually, it isn't 64.
VIIV is not a valid Roman numeral at all-- it's gibberish!

LXIV

That's 64 in Roman Numerals.
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Hopefully consumers will see true instant on PCs
The demonstration at IDF leaves you to believe there will be more functionality built onto such platforms than just multimedia.
Posted by jamie.p.walsh (288 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Hopefully consumers will see true instant on PCs
The demonstration at IDF leaves you to believe there will be more functionality built onto such platforms than just multimedia.
Posted by jamie.p.walsh (288 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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