September 21, 2005 2:59 PM PDT

Feds announce global antipiracy initiatives

The Bush administration on Wednesday announced new plans to expand its crackdown on piracy overseas.

During California visits with high-tech and movie industry representatives, Commerce Department Secretary Carlos Gutierrez described two new programs aimed at eroding intellectual property theft, which costs U.S. businesses an estimated $250 billion and 750,000 jobs per year, according to a department press release.

"The protection of intellectual property is vital to our economic growth and global competitiveness, and it has major consequences in our ongoing effort to promote security and stability around the world," he said.

One program would place intellectual property experts on the ground in regions where piracy is considered a concern. There they would work with overseas U.S. businesses and native government officials to advocate improved intellectual property rights protection, according to a department fact sheet.

Experts will be sent to Brazil, India, Russia, Thailand, China and the Middle East and serve a five-year tour of duty, the fact sheet said. One such expert is already on the job in Beijing, but it was unclear when the others would be dispatched or who they would be.

Another program, called the Global Intellectual Property Rights Academy, would train foreign judges, enforcement officials and other stakeholders in international intellectual property obligations and best practices. The academy, overseen by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, plans to convene in 24 sessions in 2006, paying all travel expenses for the foreign participants, who will come from many of the same areas where experts will be working.

The Commerce Department has recently taken other actions intended to combat international piracy. In July, President Bush created within the department a senior-level position--the coordinator for international intellectual property enforcement. The department also plans to continue holding small-business outreach seminars nationwide.

The Business Software Alliance was quick to applaud the announcement. In a press release, the organization cited survey results that pegged software piracy rates at 90 percent in China, 87 percent in Russia, 74 percent in India, 70 percent in Thailand, 64 percent in Brazil and 58 percent in the Middle East.

"In all those countries, there's a long history of bilateral discussions on IPR issues," said Robert Holleyman, chief executive of BSA. "So I think they will be very receptive to getting on-the-ground systems to help with this effort."

Holleyman said he hoped the programs would ultimately raise revenue for U.S. companies and resellers selling in foreign markets and for companies native to those markets.

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The blind leading the blind
Our partent law and the associated office have been broken for sometime. Originally IP laws sought to strike a balance between the public and the rights holders. Now that balance has been skewed by lobbiest for wealthy companies and congress critters who listen to money more than their constituents. Senator Orrin Hatch for example. In response to the RIAA's complaints about filesharing (namely the original Napster) Senator Hatch threatened to press compulsory licensing legislation. Shortly after the RIAA cashed in on the fact Hatch was amateur musician, they gave him an award and had one of Senator Hatch's favorite singer, sing one of his songs. How he's one of the biggest content industry shills in congress.
Posted by unknown unknown (1951 comments )
Reply Link Flag
The blind leading the blind
Our partent law and the associated office have been broken for sometime. Originally IP laws sought to strike a balance between the public and the rights holders. Now that balance has been skewed by lobbiest for wealthy companies and congress critters who listen to money more than their constituents. Senator Orrin Hatch for example. In response to the RIAA's complaints about filesharing (namely the original Napster) Senator Hatch threatened to press compulsory licensing legislation. Shortly after the RIAA cashed in on the fact Hatch was amateur musician, they gave him an award and had one of Senator Hatch's favorite singer, sing one of his songs. How he's one of the biggest content industry shills in congress.
Posted by unknown unknown (1951 comments )
Reply Link Flag
The blind leading the blind
Our partent law and the associated office have been broken for sometime. Originally IP laws sought to strike a balance between the public and the rights holders. Now that balance has been skewed by lobbiest for wealthy companies and congress critters who listen to money more than their constituents. Senator Orrin Hatch for example. In response to the RIAA's complaints about filesharing (namely the original Napster) Senator Hatch threatened to press compulsory licensing legislation. Shortly after the RIAA cashed in on the fact Hatch was amateur musician, they gave him an award and had one of Senator Hatch's favorite singer, sing one of his songs. How he's one of the biggest content industry shills in congress.
Posted by unknown unknown (1951 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Those darn IP terrorists...
Save the money! Save the money!
Posted by ordaj (338 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Those darn IP terrorists...
Save the money! Save the money!
Posted by ordaj (338 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Those darn IP terrorists...
Save the money! Save the money!
Posted by ordaj (338 comments )
Reply Link Flag
more mismanagement
So why are we taxpayers spending money to protect the RIAA and the MPAA. Those industries should be footing the bill to "educate" these overseas folks. After all, they're the ones who decided to start doing business in those places, and I get NO monetary benefit from either industry, so why are my tax dollars being used to fund this?
Posted by (174 comments )
Reply Link Flag
more mismanagement
So why are we taxpayers spending money to protect the RIAA and the MPAA. Those industries should be footing the bill to "educate" these overseas folks. After all, they're the ones who decided to start doing business in those places, and I get NO monetary benefit from either industry, so why are my tax dollars being used to fund this?
Posted by (174 comments )
Reply Link Flag
more mismanagement
So why are we taxpayers spending money to protect the RIAA and the MPAA. Those industries should be footing the bill to "educate" these overseas folks. After all, they're the ones who decided to start doing business in those places, and I get NO monetary benefit from either industry, so why are my tax dollars being used to fund this?
Posted by (174 comments )
Reply Link Flag
w@rEz KIdz RuLe!!
These folks need direction.. basically the software industry does have some basic principles.. regardless of which countries routers you choose to use... that being said, I think anyone at the top of the giant food chain is too far out of scope to head this on their own...

If the software is being used to generate revenue for a company or say, a sole professional, say a graphics designer or writer, the software needs to be purchased and paid for.. yes, if the user is broke they can buy used software on ebay

on the other hand, computer engineers and students need to evaulate software. software professionals absolutly need a certain amount of piracy to gage product uptake. software evaluaters, ie, warez uzers, are key to successful products. they are key to the sofware industry. The more apps you can get your hands on the better app designer you will become...

I am very concerned about hearing reports of ISPs leaking private information about their users to elected war mongers.... that is very wrong. the ISPs will be forever hated and cursed. take MaBell as an example... I am specifically refering to the imprisonment of suspected P2P file swapers.

This unwarrented behavior is wrong, very wrong. As a result, new technologies will be designed to combat this, its never ending. its in the dot will

use the money in a positive way... those rich record producers arent worth it.. MTV sucks. and all the FM stations suck. Most of the movies suck. if anything is worth keeping, it will certianly be purchased and collected.

I am glad music purchasing is not a blind activity anymore.. we have a little piracy to thank for that...
Posted by (187 comments )
Reply Link Flag
w@rEz KIdz RuLe!!
These folks need direction.. basically the software industry does have some basic principles.. regardless of which countries routers you choose to use... that being said, I think anyone at the top of the giant food chain is too far out of scope to head this on their own...

If the software is being used to generate revenue for a company or say, a sole professional, say a graphics designer or writer, the software needs to be purchased and paid for.. yes, if the user is broke they can buy used software on ebay

on the other hand, computer engineers and students need to evaulate software. software professionals absolutly need a certain amount of piracy to gage product uptake. software evaluaters, ie, warez uzers, are key to successful products. they are key to the sofware industry. The more apps you can get your hands on the better app designer you will become...

I am very concerned about hearing reports of ISPs leaking private information about their users to elected war mongers.... that is very wrong. the ISPs will be forever hated and cursed. take MaBell as an example... I am specifically refering to the imprisonment of suspected P2P file swapers.

This unwarrented behavior is wrong, very wrong. As a result, new technologies will be designed to combat this, its never ending. its in the dot will

use the money in a positive way... those rich record producers arent worth it.. MTV sucks. and all the FM stations suck. Most of the movies suck. if anything is worth keeping, it will certianly be purchased and collected.

I am glad music purchasing is not a blind activity anymore.. we have a little piracy to thank for that...
Posted by (187 comments )
Reply Link Flag
w@rEz KIdz RuLe!!
These folks need direction.. basically the software industry does have some basic principles.. regardless of which countries routers you choose to use... that being said, I think anyone at the top of the giant food chain is too far out of scope to head this on their own...

If the software is being used to generate revenue for a company or say, a sole professional, say a graphics designer or writer, the software needs to be purchased and paid for.. yes, if the user is broke they can buy used software on ebay

on the other hand, computer engineers and students need to evaulate software. software professionals absolutly need a certain amount of piracy to gage product uptake. software evaluaters, ie, warez uzers, are key to successful products. they are key to the sofware industry. The more apps you can get your hands on the better app designer you will become...

I am very concerned about hearing reports of ISPs leaking private information about their users to elected war mongers.... that is very wrong. the ISPs will be forever hated and cursed. take MaBell as an example... I am specifically refering to the imprisonment of suspected P2P file swapers.

This unwarrented behavior is wrong, very wrong. As a result, new technologies will be designed to combat this, its never ending. its in the dot will

use the money in a positive way... those rich record producers arent worth it.. MTV sucks. and all the FM stations suck. Most of the movies suck. if anything is worth keeping, it will certianly be purchased and collected.

I am glad music purchasing is not a blind activity anymore.. we have a little piracy to thank for that...
Posted by (187 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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