January 29, 2007 1:47 PM PST

Adobe: Make room for Photoshop Lightroom

Photoshop Lightroom, the photo file manager from Adobe Systems, is now available for preorder, the company announced Monday.

Adobe's photo management software, which has been in beta for months for Windows users and since 2005 for Mac OS users, is scheduled to begin shipping in mid-February.

Lightroom is a file management tool intended to complement photo-editing software such as Adobe's Photoshop. It enables photographers to import, minimally edit, manage and output batches of large digital photo files rather than having to deal with each file individually.

It is a direct competitor to Apple's Aperture 1.5 software, which currently sells for $299.

Lightroom will sell at the Adobe store for US$199 in the United States and Canada through April 30, according to Adobe. After that, it will be sold for about $299. The public beta version is set to expire February 28.

About 500,000 photographers participated in the public beta evaluation, and the company made changes based on their feedback, Adobe said in a statement.

Compared with the beta 4.1 version, Lightroom 1.0 has new keyword and metadata browsing tools for searching or filtering massive collections of digital-image files. The Key Metadata Browser incorporates color labels and a pick-or-reject system, while the import dialog box in the library module yields more file location choices when importing files, according to Adobe.

Lightroom supports more than 150 raw file formats, including those for the new Nikon D40 and D80 and Pentax K10D, as well as JPEG and TIFF files, according to Adobe.

The software runs natively on Windows PCs and on Mac computers using either Intel or Power processors. System requirements for Adobe Lightroom specify processing power, storage space, operating system and screen resolution.

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Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Systems Inc., Adobe PhotoShop, beta, Apple Macintosh

2 comments

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Native support for RAW
Native Support for RAW images will be fantastic for those of us looking to squeeze the most juice out of our small CCD endowed Panasonic camera's.

I have a Panasonic FZ50 with all the add on wide angle (28mm) and telephoto (to 720mm) lenses. This is the best camera in the world, for my needs (so don't tell me to go and get a D200 or something). But every now and then the invitable noise factor creeps in and then I wish I had a camera with a larger CCD.

RAW goes a long way towards aleviating the noise without sacrificing detail, but the post processing tools supplied with the camera are not exaclty the best in the world. So it will be fantastic to do post processing in a familier top notch dark room tool again.
Posted by simelane (169 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Native support for RAW
Native Support for RAW images will be fantastic for those of us looking to squeeze the most juice out of our small CCD endowed Panasonic camera's.

I have a Panasonic FZ50 with all the add on wide angle (28mm) and telephoto (to 720mm) lenses. This is the best camera in the world, for my needs (so don't tell me to go and get a D200 or something). But every now and then the invitable noise factor creeps in and then I wish I had a camera with a larger CCD.

RAW goes a long way towards aleviating the noise without sacrificing detail, but the post processing tools supplied with the camera are not exaclty the best in the world. So it will be fantastic to do post processing in a familier top notch dark room tool again.
Posted by simelane (169 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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