February 6, 2006 4:00 AM PST

A video slam-dunk for the NBA

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Garrick Barr, a computer hobbyist and former college basketball player, is trying to merge both of his passions into one sports technology company.

Barr is the founder and CEO of Synergy Sports Technology, which is attempting to edit, log and organize digital video clips of every play from each game in the National Basketball Association this season.

It's a TiVo-like service for basketball decision makers. Coaches and scouts can access the video at Barr's Web site and within seconds watch streaming video on their laptops of every three-pointer attempted by Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant or every tomahawk dunk by Cleveland Cavaliers swingman LeBron James.

Across the sports landscape, professional teams are taking a more scientific approach to running their businesses. With so much money on the line, executives and coaches who often relied on hunches and gut instincts are starting to do what nearly every other industry already does--make decisions based on hard data.

The 2003 best-selling Michael Lewis book, "Moneyball," showed how data analysis is starting to change baseball. That lesson has not been lost on NBA teams.

In an e-mail interview, Mark Cuban, Dallas Mavericks owner and the co-founder of Broadcast.com, said he has been impressed with Synergy but was "only surprised that it took this long" for a service like this to emerge.

Founded in August 2004 by Barr and Nils Lahr, a former Microsoft engineer who worked on the original Windows streaming media, Synergy is in its first full NBA season. With four paying customers--Dallas, Miami, Boston and Indiana--the company is trying to grow without any venture funding or seed money from NBA teams. Barr's backers are mostly friends and family.

Nonetheless, Synergy's system is more than a digital highlight reel. NBA executives say that it could be the start of a new trend. During an 82-game season, every nuance a coach can pick up about a weakness in an opponent's offense or in the jump shot of one of his own players can mean more points on the scoreboard.

Click here to Play

Video: Every play counts
Synergy is logging NBA games and correlating video with the stats. CNET News.com's Harry Fuller introduces you to the man in charge of logging this entire NBA season.

Before now, coaches could wait days while their staffs edited, logged and transferred digital files to DVDs. With Synergy, a coach logs on at Synergy's site and performs a search for the video he wants. The clips streamed to his computer can be slowed, paused or reversed. He sees what he wants when he wants it.

After watching six players for an hour apiece on Synergy one night last week, David Griffin, the Phoenix Suns' assistant general manager in charge of player personnel, said he "knows so much more about those guys now."

"To be able to watch video of every NBA player and watch every facet of their game without any advanced preparation is unheard of," he said.

Barr employs more than 30 people, or "loggers," as Barr calls them, to match up video of each play with important statistical information: which players have the ball, what type of play is involved and the result.

Combining statistical information makes it possible for Synergy's search engine to quickly find what coaches are looking for. Synergy can help Lakers' coach Phil Jackson pull up clips of the Portland Trail Blazers on the fast break in the Rose Garden, their home arena. It can show Miami coach Pat Riley each of the driving layups taken by Suns guard Steve Nash this season. Whatever Riley learns can help him instruct Heat guard Dwyane "The Flash" Wade on how to defend the league's reigning MVP.

Click here to Play

Video: Follow the bouncing ball
Synergy hopes to sell its analytical tools to every NBA team. CNET News.com's Harry Fuller looks over the shoulder of Synergy's Andy Graham to see what the pros can see.

By offering such a comprehensive view of players and teams, Synergy could one day make it possible for NBA franchises to reduce travel and labor costs, says Pacers CEO Donnie Walsh.

NBA teams have seen their travel costs skyrocket in the past five years, particularly because of scouting for high school and international players in addition to league opponents. Barr doesn't disclose what Synergy charges other than to say that the figure is five digits. But whatever it is, Walsh said the system is worth the money.

Still, Walsh said, nothing will ever replace the need to scout players in person--at least once.

"I think it will always be important to see players perform live," said Walsh, considered one of the league's best talent evaluators. "You need to get a feel for a player's size and quickness. Once that's done, maybe you can track his development on a system like (Synergy)."

Synergy's system was developed by Lahr. Barr's brother-in-law introduced him to Lahr, who acknowledges not being a sports fan. Nonetheless, he was intrigued by Barr's idea and quickly agreed to join the project as a partner.

CONTINUED: How it works…
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2 comments

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Isn't this like sharing music?
So when are the media outlets going to sue this company into the group? I'm sure there isn't a fair use law that will be shown that the company must pay for the rights to "distribute, copy, or broadcast" the media ****** content.
Posted by zeroplane (286 comments )
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No...
If you actually read the story...they are an authorized user of the video as they have a contract with an NBA team.

Also...this is exactly what the PORN industry has been doing for years. This is how they pump out feature videos of any act you want. They have video loggers (at least Vivid does) that go through every film.

Then when they want a compilation they just call every clip up on a database.
Posted by KsprayDad (375 comments )
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