November 17, 2005 5:25 PM PST

iPods to support copy-protected CDs?

The EMI Group record label said music from its copy-protected CDs will soon play on Apple Computer's iPod digital music players, but the iPod maker disagrees.

For more than a year, the anti-copying technology loaded on some major label compact discs has been compatible only with Windows-based computers. Those CDs have allowed listeners to move digital files onto the computers, but they have not been able to transfer those songs to iPods.

EMI's upcoming copy-protected CDs, which will use technology from Macrovision, and will at last be compatible with iPods, a change nearly a year in the making, the label said.

"Apple is nearly finished with the technical work necessary to enable consumers to transfer music from content-protected discs to their iPods," the label said in a statement detailing its copy-protection plans. "This is an important step for EMI and Apple, but even more so for music consumers who will soon be able to legitimately port music from protected discs they own to the iPod."

However, Apple disputed EMI's characterization of its plans.

"The information EMI provided regarding iTunes and iPod compatibility with Macrovision's technology is not true and we have no idea why EMI made this statement," Apple said in a statement.

If true, the agreement would mark a substantial step forward for advocates of copy-protecting CDs, even as the ongoing controversy over Sony's actions has cast the practice into controversy.

EMI and Sony BMG each have committed to sharply increasing the number of CDs that are protected with technology that limits the number and type of copies that can be made. Each label has been experimenting with different varieties of this technology for several years, in the United States and overseas.

While CD copy protection as a whole has triggered some criticism from fair-use advocates, it is only the latest release from Sony, using technology from British company First 4 Internet, that has become a mainstream controversy.

That software used a powerful programming tool called a "rootkit" to hide virtually all traces of its presence on a hard drive, using a technique favored by virus writers that instantly triggered suspicion from many computer developers. Worse, that tool wound up exposing computers to a variety of dangerous security risks, some of which have already been exploited by virus writers.

Sony has recalled the 4.7 million CDs that included the First 4 Internet software, and has said it will exchange the 2.1 million albums already sold with the technology installed. The company has also released albums using antipiracy technology from Sunncomm, which has not posed the security risks of the First 4 Internet variants.

EMI has been quick to distinguish its plans from Sony's First 4 Internet discs. It is adopting copy-protection tools from Macrovision, which do not install hidden files on PCs and do not download any software without consumers' permission, the label says.

EMI said its CDs will have usage rules similar to songs purchased from the iTunes music store. Consumers will be allowed to "rip" one full copy-protected version of the album to their computer, from which it can be transferred to MP3 players. Three copies of the full disc can be made on blank CDs, and each individual track can be burned to CD seven times.

The discs will also include additional content, such as artwork, artist bios and videos, the label said.

21 comments

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Copy-protection doesn't work
Copy Protected CDs have had absolutely zero impact upon the
unauthorized distribution of music.
The only function they currently serve is to frustrate consumers
and remove traditional fair-use rights.
A couple more sony fiasco's and maybe they'll realize this. Until
then consumers should not buy them as, it has been shown, they
also may compromise your machine's stability, privacy, and/or
security.
Posted by axcess99 (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
Comsumers have a program too
We consumers have a "Kickbutt" program we can use to counter this "Rootkit" invasion. It's called "Not Buying Any More Sony BMG CD's" I'll bet ours works better than theirs.
Posted by yrrahxob (77 comments )
Reply Link Flag
We also have...
We also have a format we are all happy with...it's called mp3. No Apple FairPlay (which is the crux of Apple's problem here), etc...just free open mp3's baby.
Posted by anarchyreigns (299 comments )
Link Flag
EMI Can Kiss My Ass
Hasn't this company learned anything from Sony? We don't want you DRM.
Posted by aabcdefghij987654321 (1721 comments )
Reply Link Flag
And we will pay less?
In most European countries blank cd's, VR's etc. have a fee in the price that you have to pay to have the right to make a copy for private use. Much discussed, because several European countries want to add the same fee to MP3 players, and the actual charge varies widely across countries.

However, if record companies start to restrict the rights to copy cd's, I guess we don't have to pay that fee anymore?

I think it's time we consumers have to seek out the courts, because we have to pay more and more over time for less rights -- somewhere something is not right.
Posted by tennapel (22 comments )
Reply Link Flag
In the USA too
The "tax" applies in the USA as well, and to blank tape as well. It is the absolute epitome of corporate greed.

Here's what they don't like. Consumers have caused a revolution in the way that music is distributed and listened to. The new model may have revenue possibilities for the artists, but the "middleman" is cut out of the game. And in the extortion business called entertainment, those "middlemen" are the record companies.
Posted by R. U. Sirius (745 comments )
Link Flag
ARE YOU SERIOUS???!!!!
This DRM thing is getting out of control. I'm officially done with buying music legally.

Soulseek here I come.
Posted by solano28 (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
And the madness goes on.
When will these companies realize that any form of copy protection will hamper sales? Being a Linux user, I cannot play any music that has DRM included. This restriction has stopped me from purchasing any music from these labels over the past 3 years. I refuse to support any label that uses DRM to "protect their property" from piracy.
Posted by tonyric (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
Censoring Music For Kids Not Possible
I currently censor some of my music by using Audacity (just in case the kids are around while I'm listening to it). With this copy-protected junk I believe this becomes impossible. You are then forced to buy the "clean" version which isn't always available. In any case, even with the "clean" CDs being available I'd still like to be able to edit the music and remove whatever content I don't like my kids to hear.

Copy protection- no thanks! I won't be buying any EMI and Sony BMG music in future. At least there are some labels that aren't doing this kind of thing yet.
Posted by (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Boycott DRM
"Copy protection- no thanks! I won't be buying any EMI and Sony BMG music in future. At least there are some labels that aren't doing this kind of thing yet."

Keep boycotting DRM and the other labels will see that their decision to avoid DRM is the right decision. You can bet that the other labels are keeping a close eye on this. If we give in to DRM and buy from EMI and Sony BMG, then the other labels will see that we are willing to have our rights trampled upon and they will jump on the DRM bandwagon. Boycott DRM!!
Posted by (61 comments )
Link Flag
BS Story ... Technically and Ethically
Apple not only did not, not comment, THEY SAID IT WAS UNTRUE

Of course CNET will post it anyway. But lets take a step back.

How if the bleeping world doe a media device, that does NOT
have a CD player attatched to it HAVE ANYTHING TO DO WITH
CD copy protected software!? ANSWER ... NOTHING, NADA , ZIP

Ok, so NOW you are going to say you didnt write the article
correctly (OF COURSE YOU DIDNT) and that you meant the DRM
encryption of the song track. Hmmmmm, once again, the iPod
has a list of supported file formats, and if it isn't one of them,
then once again BULL-SHI-T.

I am really, and truly, coming to such a degree disgust for these
slanderous stories .... I wonder, can CNET have the caca SUED
OUT OF THEM FOR PRINTING INTENTIONALLY FALSE
STATEMENTS TO AFFECT THE MARKETPLACE?!!!
Posted by Thomas, David (1947 comments )
Reply Link Flag
I think you missed something!
<quote>
However, Apple disputed EMI's characterization of its plans.

"The information EMI provided regarding iTunes and iPod compatibility with Macrovision's technology is not true and we have no idea why EMI made this statement," Apple said in a statement.
</quote>

CNET had this article because obviously they're try to show both sides of the story. At least they reported both sides of the story.
Posted by aabcdefghij987654321 (1721 comments )
Link Flag
CNET can't stay consistant...
FIRST PARAGRAPHS: Not only no but Hell No!

However, Apple disputed EMI's characterization of its plans.

"The information EMI provided regarding iTunes and iPod
compatibility with Macrovision's technology is not true and we
have no idea why EMI made this statement," Apple said in a
statement.

NEXT PARAGRAPH: Ignoring Apple's statement totally,

If true, the agreement would mark a substantial step forward for
advocates of copy-protecting CDs, even as the ongoing
controversy over Sony's actions has cast the practice into
controversy.

'IF TRUE'!!!!!!, and it is absolutely NOT true based upon all
evidence so far. CNET is trying to create news, not just report
news.

Next we'll have someone claiming that Apple is thinking about
building a Bridge to Mars, and Apple will say 'no way, no how'
and CNET will say, "if true, it will cut driving time substantially".

Just how dumb can a story get?
Posted by Earl Benser (4310 comments )
Reply Link Flag
incompatible w/ iPod?
"Those CDs have allowed listeners to move digital files onto the computers, but they have not been able to transfer those songs to iPods"

this is not true. this was actually my initial concern when record cos. starting publishing these CDs. I thought "what a way to reward your loyal consumers!". and so much for 'fair use". but for some reason, when i loaded these copy-controlled CDs onto iTunes, i had no problem importing the audio. there would be an error message saying, i had to install the program that came w/ the disc but iTunes appears to override it and the importation begins w/ ease. I've also had no problem trasferring these to my iPod or w/ burning these on a blank CD.
Posted by mannix87 (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
helium or hydrogen?
I haven't bought a CD in years. Music that is published now generally sucks-- mostly bubblegum-chewing pop princesses who think that a chirpy giggle stands as intelligent expression of thought.

Now do the genious of SONY and other music publishing labels will I buy a CD soon? Not even with a twitchy, sweaty publishing exec's finger glued to the trigger of the gun pointed at my head.

Treating consumers as criminals and then going off with the full knowledge that the so-called "technology" can damage computers and then lying about is NOT good business. Consumers have a voice and if you **** us off you'll be doing a Hindenberg.

The technology used by SONY and others is not copy-protection-- it's an annoyance. It can be by-passed in Windows or ignored all together using an Apple or Linux.

Now SONY is doing damage control trying to fill their balloon with helium when the thing already has hydrogen-- good luck.. I already see the flames.
Posted by captaincanuck (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
Now that's funny...
I recently purchased FooFighters which contained files that were unable to be imported into Itunes. When I did import them they were all "clicky" and messed up. Yet after contacting Sony, they told me to import my files into Windows Media Player, then burn a new disc from media player, then import into Itunes. This totally works. I've got a couple albums on my Ipod that had "protection" and they gave me the answer to fix it! So what's the big deal?
Posted by shaycam (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Thanks for the solution Shycam!
Shycam's solution works briliantly. One recommendation is to use a re-writable CD, unless you really want a cd with mp3 quality tracks burned to it...

"import [the content protected] files into Windows Media Player, then burn a new disc from media player, then import into Itunes"
Posted by mikelaughs (1 comment )
Link Flag
Transfer iPod/iPhone/iTouch stuff to computer or recover lost or missing music, backup and restore all of iPod/iPhone/iTouch content I recommend you Cucusoft iPhone/iTouch/iPod to Computer Transfer. This software can keep your iPod/iPhone safety.
http://www.dvd-video-converters.com/ipodconverter/ipod--itouch-iphone-transfer.html
Posted by coconunu (14 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Transfer iPod/iPhone/iTouch stuff to computer or recover lost or missing music, backup and restore all of iPod/iPhone/iTouch content I recommend you Cucusoft iPhone/iTouch/iPod to Computer Transfer. This software can keep your iPod/iPhone safety.
http://www.ipod-to-pc.net/
Posted by coconunu (14 comments )
Reply Link Flag
As we all know, iTunes can only transfer the files to iPod. Recently, our computer crashed and all of the files on iTunes was gone, but they are still in my iPod. I spent over 6 hours trying to find out how to transfer my ipod files to my PC and the emepty iTunes. I thought it would be a good idea to make a tutorial for iPod fans who was confused by how to transfer songs, videos, photos and playlist etc. from iPod to computer or iTunes!!!! hahaa
I tried a third party software name Cucusoft iPhone/iTouch/iPod to Computer Transfer to extract the songs, videos, photos and playlist etc. from iPod to computer or iTunes.

Software: Cucusoft iPhone/iTouch/iPod to Computer Transfer
Support iPod: iPod/iPod Nano/iPod shuffle, also iPhone and iTouch

It can help iPod fans to transfer iPod songs, videos, photos and playlist backup to PC or iTunes that iTunes can not do when solve you encounter the following familiar problems:

? when your computer crashes down, your files on computer and iTunes was gone;
? when you buy a new PC, you want to transfer your iPod files to your new computer;
? when you like your friends iPod songs and want to transfer them to your computer;
? when your friends want your iPod songs and videos to his/her computer;
? when you have a new iPod and want to transfer iPod video and audio between them;
? when you want to transfer the files between your iPod/iPhone or your friends? iPod/iPhone;
? share two different iPods on iTunes;
? ?

more:
http://www.converter123.com/iPhone-Software/Cucusoft-iPhone/iTouch/iPod-to-Computer-Transfer.html
Posted by yoyotokiki (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
 

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