February 28, 2007 6:23 AM PST

Wal-Mart stalls solar-power plan

Related Stories

Wal-Mart readies large-scale move into solar power

January 3, 2007
Wal-Mart Stores' choice of providers for a solar-power investment has been put off past its anticipated date, according to people familiar with the process.

The retail giant at the end of last year put out a request for proposals to suppliers soliciting bids on what could be a large-scale installation of solar electric power at company stores.

Responses to bids, initially expected at the end of February, are being delayed, according to two people with knowledge of the situation.

Wal-Mart solar-power stores

One company bidding on the deal said Wal-Mart's decision has been put off four to six weeks, which would put the date for bid responses in April.

"I'm actually not too surprised. They only gave themselves six or seven weeks to evaluate some very complex proposals covering stores in multiple states," an executive at a solar provider said. "They're smart to take their time."

A Wal-Mart representative on Tuesday declined to provide further details on the company's solar-power request for proposal.

The company's moves in renewable energy are closely watched because of its sheer size and its stated commitments to environmentally friendly practices.

Clean-technology consultant Joel Makower, who saw the original proposal, said in a blog in January that the investment could represent 100 megawatts of power, dwarfing other well-known corporate solar-power installations.

Wal-Mart has a long-term policy headed up by Andy Ruben, vice president of corporate strategy and sustainability, of using 100 percent renewable energy.

Another goal stated by Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott is to make its stores 20 percent to 30 percent more energy-efficient.

The company has two experimental stores--in McKinney, Texas, and Aurora, Colo.--that use renewable power sources including solar and wind. In January, it opened four high-efficiency stores designed to serve as prototypes for the clean-energy initiative, according to the company.

See more CNET content tagged:
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., RFP, renewable energy, store

8 comments

Join the conversation!
Add your comment
Why Do These Stores Have Such High Ceilings?
Why do these big box stores always have such high ceilings? These stores are cavernous. Seems like dead, wasted space that takes a large amount of energy to light and heat/cool. They should be building basements to store their excess inventory; that would only require a minimum of lighting and temp control.
Posted by Stating (869 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Re: Why high ceilings?
As a Wal*Mart associate I have often wondered that myself. The only place in the store where the large ceiling is utilized is in receiving which is also where we store most of our back stock. Also taking into consideration our in store security system they could still drop a good 10 feet down and still have adequate room for signage and cameras. But if you take a look at other big box stores and some outlet stores you will see they all have high ceilings. I guess we would need to ask a store designer. We have a remodel coming up I just may do that once home office comes in to get things geared up.
Posted by MorganTN (6 comments )
Link Flag
Why Do These Stores Have Such High Ceilings?
Why do these big box stores always have such high ceilings? These stores are cavernous. Seems like dead, wasted space that takes a large amount of energy to light and heat/cool. They should be building basements to store their excess inventory; that would only require a minimum of lighting and temp control.
Posted by Stating (869 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Re: Why high ceilings?
As a Wal*Mart associate I have often wondered that myself. The only place in the store where the large ceiling is utilized is in receiving which is also where we store most of our back stock. Also taking into consideration our in store security system they could still drop a good 10 feet down and still have adequate room for signage and cameras. But if you take a look at other big box stores and some outlet stores you will see they all have high ceilings. I guess we would need to ask a store designer. We have a remodel coming up I just may do that once home office comes in to get things geared up.
Posted by MorganTN (6 comments )
Link Flag
Maybe Wal-Mart is not so evil
Maybe like a lesser kind of evil. Not quite Hitler evil, but still a little
evil.
Posted by doodr9 (36 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Maybe Wal-Mart is not so evil
Maybe like a lesser kind of evil. Not quite Hitler evil, but still a little
evil.
Posted by doodr9 (36 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Finally a large, nationwide firm to set an example
I think this is great news! Walmart taking this step will be a great example to show how beneficial solar power has to offer. It will take a large scale implementation like this to get others to take notice. I think that Walmart is taking their time is a great thing.

The US has far greater solar energy potential than most countries, yet Germany leads the world in installed solar power systems, despite the fact that their weather is far less favorable to solar power than most of the US. Also don't forget the fact that Germany is only about twice the size of Wisconsin. We should easily be further ahead with solar power than anyone - we have the financial capabilities and the sunlight. Our legislators just need to stop pandering to the oil boys. Solar power systems aren't cheaper in Germany, but the government there has made it a priority and have implemented programs to make it financially more feasible. Hopefully Walmart's move will have a stimulus effect for solar in the US.
Posted by dcis_steve (19 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Finally a large, nationwide firm to set an example
I think this is great news! Walmart taking this step will be a great example to show how beneficial solar power has to offer. It will take a large scale implementation like this to get others to take notice. I think that Walmart is taking their time is a great thing.

The US has far greater solar energy potential than most countries, yet Germany leads the world in installed solar power systems, despite the fact that their weather is far less favorable to solar power than most of the US. Also don't forget the fact that Germany is only about twice the size of Wisconsin. We should easily be further ahead with solar power than anyone - we have the financial capabilities and the sunlight. Our legislators just need to stop pandering to the oil boys. Solar power systems aren't cheaper in Germany, but the government there has made it a priority and have implemented programs to make it financially more feasible. Hopefully Walmart's move will have a stimulus effect for solar in the US.
Posted by dcis_steve (19 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

Join the conversation

Add your comment

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Click here to review our Terms of Use.

What's Hot

Discussions

Shared

RSS Feeds

Add headlines from CNET News to your homepage or feedreader.