June 19, 2006 11:06 AM PDT

University opens school for hackers

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A degree course in computer hacking has been launched by a Scottish university in response to industry demand for IT security experts.

The University of Abertay in Dundee will run the Bachelor of Science undergraduate course in "Ethical Hacking and Countermeasures" starting in the next academic year in October.

Around 30 students will be enrolled in the course, which the university says will provide a graduate with knowledge of how illegal computer attacks can be performed and how they can be stopped.

The course catalog description says: "In the same way that police detectives need to know how thieves can steal, computer systems administrators need to know what hackers can do."

The university said it has launched the degree course in response to demand for people with the skills to test the security of corporate IT networks. "There are an increasing number of compliance regulations and insurance policies that insist businesses carry out security checks on their networks," a representative for the academic institution said.

The university also stressed it will be vetting students "very carefully" in accordance with Home Office guidelines and that they will be monitored closely throughout the course. "We are not going to give them the full set of tools on day one," the representative said.

Although many existing undergraduate computing degrees cover elements of this new course, Abertay claims to be the first U.K. university to offer a dedicated degree course in hacking.

There are also ethical hacking courses and qualifications offered by private sector IT training organizations such as the Training Camp, which launched a course two years ago.

Andy McCue of Silicon.com reported from London.

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10 comments

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Nothing New...
This has already been done by several universities in the US that specialize in CS. Usually used in classes that discuss network security and software engineering.
Posted by 8ball629 (80 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Oops
I got caught with my foot in my own mouth, I guess I have to read a bit further ;).
Posted by 8ball629 (80 comments )
Link Flag
Nothing New...
This has already been done by several universities in the US that specialize in CS. Usually used in classes that discuss network security and software engineering.
Posted by 8ball629 (80 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Oops
I got caught with my foot in my own mouth, I guess I have to read a bit further ;).
Posted by 8ball629 (80 comments )
Link Flag
Kewl...huh
well ane chances of "ethical hacking" being introduced in skool at primary level.????????
Posted by neo.rulzzz (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Kewl...huh
well ane chances of "ethical hacking" being introduced in skool at primary level.????????
Posted by neo.rulzzz (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Kewl...huh
well any chances of "ethical hacking" being introduced in skool at primary level.????????
Posted by neo.rulzzz (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Kewl...huh
well any chances of "ethical hacking" being introduced in skool at primary level.????????
Posted by neo.rulzzz (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Good idea - high risk though
I don't know about schools overseas, but if a major university offered a class entitled "Hacking 101", it would be the first CS course to fill up.

I believe that the best way to fight the battle is to see it from our opponents standpoint, but the issue still is that if we teach 30 people about hacking, how many will use it for negative purposes? Out of the class of 30, if 3 of them, at some point in their lives, choose to turn over to the dark side then theres 3 more hackers to worry about.

While this scenario still leaves us with a 10:1 good:bad ratio, I still don't think that companies want anyone else out there with the potential to cause massive problems.
<a class="jive-link-external" href="http://www.essentialsecurity.com/Documents/article1.htm" target="_newWindow">http://www.essentialsecurity.com/Documents/article1.htm</a>
Posted by Nkully86 (59 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Good idea - high risk though
I don't know about schools overseas, but if a major university offered a class entitled "Hacking 101", it would be the first CS course to fill up.

I believe that the best way to fight the battle is to see it from our opponents standpoint, but the issue still is that if we teach 30 people about hacking, how many will use it for negative purposes? Out of the class of 30, if 3 of them, at some point in their lives, choose to turn over to the dark side then theres 3 more hackers to worry about.

While this scenario still leaves us with a 10:1 good:bad ratio, I still don't think that companies want anyone else out there with the potential to cause massive problems.
<a class="jive-link-external" href="http://www.essentialsecurity.com/Documents/article1.htm" target="_newWindow">http://www.essentialsecurity.com/Documents/article1.htm</a>
Posted by Nkully86 (59 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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