September 28, 2005 8:55 AM PDT

The $100 laptop moves closer to reality

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--A low-cost computer for the masses moved one step closer to reality on Wednesday.

Nicholas Negroponte, the co-founder of the Media Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, detailed specifications for a $100 windup-powered laptop targeted at children in developing nations.

Negroponte, who laid out his original proposal at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January, said MIT and his nonprofit group, called One Laptop Per Child, is in discussions with five countries--Brazil, China, Thailand, Egypt and South Africa--to distribute up to 15 million test systems to children.

The $100 laptop

In addition, Massachusetts is working with MIT on a plan to distribute the laptops to schoolchildren, Negroponte said.

"This is the most important thing I have ever done in my life," Negroponte said on Wednesday during a presentation at Technology Review's Emerging Technologies Conference at MIT. "Reception has been incredible. The idea is simple. It's an education project, not a laptop project. If we can make education better--particularly primary and secondary schools--it will be a better world."

He said a goal of the project is to make the low-cost PC idea a grassroots movement that will spread in popularity, like the Linux operating system or the Wikipedia free online encyclopedia. "This is open-source education. It's a big issue."

Negroponte said the idea is that governments will pay roughly $100 for the laptops and will distribute them for free to students.

The proposed design of the machines calls for a 500MHz processor, 1GB of memory and an innovative dual-mode display that can be used in full-color mode, or in a black-and-white sunlight-readable mode. The display makes the laptop "both an electronic book and a laptop," he said.

One display design being considered is a flat, flexible printed display developed at MIT's Media Lab. Negroponte said the technology can be used to produce displays that cost roughly 10 cents per square inch. "The target is $12 for a 12-inch display with near-zero power consumption," he said.

Power for the new systems will be provided through either conventional electric current, batteries or by a windup crank attached to the side of the notebooks, since many countries targeted by the plan do not have power in remote areas, Negroponte said.

The machines, which will run a version of the Linux operating system, will also include other applications, some developed by MIT researchers, as well as country-specific software. "Software has gotten too fat and unreliable, so we started with Linux," he said.

For connectivity, the systems will be Wi-Fi- and cell phone-enabled, and will include four USB ports, along with built-in "mesh networking," a peer-to-peer concept that allows machines to share a single Internet connection.

"In emerging nations, the issue is not connectivity," Negroponte said. "That was the issue, but there are many people working on it, (thanks to) global competitiveness. But for education, the roadblock is the laptop."

Five companies are working with MIT to develop an initial 5 million to 15 million test units within the year: Google, Advanced Micro Devices, News Corp., Red Hat and BrightStar, Negroponte said. He said the current plan is to produce 100 million to 150 million units by 2007.

Negroponte admits that his goals are ambitious. Currently, the world production of laptops is just under 50 million, he said.

While the initial goal of the project is to work with governments, Negroponte said MIT is considering licensing the design or giving it to a third-party company to build commercial versions of the PC. "Those might be available for $200, and $20 or $30 will come back to us to make the kids' laptops. We're still working on that," he said.

Others have launched low-cost PC ideas in the past, though MIT's project may be the most ambitious.

Last year, Advanced Micro Devices announced plans for its Personal Internet Connector--a prototype with a price tag of at least $185, with no display. And an Indian company called Novatium said it plans to offer a stripped-down home computer for about $70 or $75.

In addition, Microsoft's antipiracy-minded Steve Ballmer last year called for a move toward the $100 PC for developing nations.

225 comments

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Very ambitious, but...
What children in poorer nations need is - food, clean drinking
water and clothing, along with basic education. Even $100 is alot of
money for them. Where many people make less then $10 a day, I
can assure you laptops are the last thing in their mind.
Posted by indrakanti (90 comments )
Reply Link Flag
I dont think
the africans with aids and distended stomaches because they dont eat are the ones that they aim at getting these too... not all poor people are that desolate...
Posted by volterwd (466 comments )
Link Flag
I agree
as much as its a great way to spread information, its not going to feed them. and im sure put in the hands of the government distributing them, im sure the information they do recive would be more propaganda.
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Long Term View
Hi,

I see what you're saying - they do need food and water. However, giving them food and water won't help break the poverty cycle. It will merely build nations which are dependant upon hand-outs.

$100 for a laptop which can educate a number of people on an infinate number of subjects is cheap compared to the equivalent in text-books.

With improved education, entire nations will eventually be able to work themselves out of poverty.

I'm not saying we shouldn't help - far from it - I just think that the $100 laptop COULD be one of the best investments in the long term.

- Chris
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Too rich to get the concept?
And I can assure you that you're concept of poverty isn't very realistic based on your comments.

Actually places where workers earn around $10 per day are exactly where this type of machine would hit the make/break point between being given away and being sold for the equivalent of $100 USD. People making that much could actually afford it. Places where workers make $300USD per *year* is where this project is more likely targeted. They couldn't afford it and it would reduce the expense of providing education so that money could be spent on something else, like maybe clean water and food.

>>What children in poorer nations need is - food, clean drinking water and clothing, along with basic education.<<

This project is part of basic education and could free up money for more basic needs so why are you speaking out against it?
Posted by Lynn_S (52 comments )
Link Flag
Re: Very ambitious, but...
Jack,

$100 is the target offer price to local governments in order for them to purchase a learning tool for the children.

$100 is not intended to be purchase by children.

Please read all related news of such project.
Posted by georgetang (12 comments )
Link Flag
I agree with you! and what about the kids in our country are they not as important as any others? I think we need to put "AMERICA" first!!!
Posted by SUNSHINE2940 (34 comments )
Link Flag
Very ambitious, but...
What children in poorer nations need is - food, clean drinking
water and clothing, along with basic education. Even $100 is alot of
money for them. Where many people make less then $10 a day, I
can assure you laptops are the last thing in their mind.
Posted by indrakanti (90 comments )
Reply Link Flag
I dont think
the africans with aids and distended stomaches because they dont eat are the ones that they aim at getting these too... not all poor people are that desolate...
Posted by volterwd (466 comments )
Link Flag
I agree
as much as its a great way to spread information, its not going to feed them. and im sure put in the hands of the government distributing them, im sure the information they do recive would be more propaganda.
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Long Term View
Hi,

I see what you're saying - they do need food and water. However, giving them food and water won't help break the poverty cycle. It will merely build nations which are dependant upon hand-outs.

$100 for a laptop which can educate a number of people on an infinate number of subjects is cheap compared to the equivalent in text-books.

With improved education, entire nations will eventually be able to work themselves out of poverty.

I'm not saying we shouldn't help - far from it - I just think that the $100 laptop COULD be one of the best investments in the long term.

- Chris
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Too rich to get the concept?
And I can assure you that you're concept of poverty isn't very realistic based on your comments.

Actually places where workers earn around $10 per day are exactly where this type of machine would hit the make/break point between being given away and being sold for the equivalent of $100 USD. People making that much could actually afford it. Places where workers make $300USD per *year* is where this project is more likely targeted. They couldn't afford it and it would reduce the expense of providing education so that money could be spent on something else, like maybe clean water and food.

>>What children in poorer nations need is - food, clean drinking water and clothing, along with basic education.<<

This project is part of basic education and could free up money for more basic needs so why are you speaking out against it?
Posted by Lynn_S (52 comments )
Link Flag
Re: Very ambitious, but...
Jack,

$100 is the target offer price to local governments in order for them to purchase a learning tool for the children.

$100 is not intended to be purchase by children.

Please read all related news of such project.
Posted by georgetang (12 comments )
Link Flag
What Will Be The Scenarios....
When all these children in the developing world grow up to become adults, move into the productive labor forces where the Microsoft $$$ backed "Office" productivity suite may very well still be the "king" of the road; also, much more American jobs becoming exportable in addition to the increased number of H1B, (HSLW1 - Highly Skilled Low Wage 1 Visas...). Will this strategy be more Americans on the bread lines and the now touted $100 laptop becoming paper weights in some homes or offices.
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Good, but what about Urban communities here
I would like to know why everyone is talking about helping developing countries, when in fact America is becoming more of a third world country everyday thanks to the decline of public education. This technology is desperately needed in today's classrooms so that children here in America will actually have a chance of getting decent paying jobs, without have to pay to go to private high schools. In colleges most of the students of excel are those from either high income housing and private schools or those who are from other countries. That means that our government needs to do a lot better in providing better education for ALL students and not just some. If they don't America will be a third world country, because it is very clear that the middle class is about to go up in smoke.
Posted by bowenwi (2 comments )
Link Flag
What Will Be The Scenarios....
When all these children in the developing world grow up to become adults, move into the productive labor forces where the Microsoft $$$ backed "Office" productivity suite may very well still be the "king" of the road; also, much more American jobs becoming exportable in addition to the increased number of H1B, (HSLW1 - Highly Skilled Low Wage 1 Visas...). Will this strategy be more Americans on the bread lines and the now touted $100 laptop becoming paper weights in some homes or offices.
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Good, but what about Urban communities here
I would like to know why everyone is talking about helping developing countries, when in fact America is becoming more of a third world country everyday thanks to the decline of public education. This technology is desperately needed in today's classrooms so that children here in America will actually have a chance of getting decent paying jobs, without have to pay to go to private high schools. In colleges most of the students of excel are those from either high income housing and private schools or those who are from other countries. That means that our government needs to do a lot better in providing better education for ALL students and not just some. If they don't America will be a third world country, because it is very clear that the middle class is about to go up in smoke.
Posted by bowenwi (2 comments )
Link Flag
What about *OUR* students?
Forget about the world for a minute. What about *OUR* poor,
*OUR* students? I say tackle issues at home first. I'm damned
sick, as an american, of hearing all of the effort we're pouring
into countries abroad, when we've got high school graduates
who routinely can't read. No Child Left Behind doesn't work,
most students still don't have adequate access to technology
that's becoming more and more a requirement. And we're not a
third world country.

Most schoold districts here don't have enough qualified tech
people, many businesses here complain of a lack of qualified
techs HERE. So let's start there.
Posted by (14 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Americans do have access to technology.
I don't believe in the so-called digital divide. We live in a country where you can buy a $100 used PC & monitor with dial-up internet access. For $100 on eBay you could buy a 500MHz Emachine with a 17" monitor if you can pick it up instead of paying to ship it. The $100 laptops are going to be SOLD in poor countries, not given away as an act of government charity. Plus, in America we spend way too much money on education. We spend more than any other country but we have the educational level of Pakistan.
Posted by lingsun (482 comments )
Link Flag
yeah, what about them...
don't be sick of efforts to help the world -- they need to go on. america, on the whole, enjoys privileges most people will never know. there's plenty of wealth and brains to go around. a reader above mentioned used PCs -- for the students here, this is much more apropos - easy to ship and usually a bit more powerful. the problem in the us is that the efforts to bring cheap PCs to kids here still use winblows and office; a critical factor in keeping PCs cheap is keeping the software costs down, can't be done. here's an idea: get a grant for giving underprivileged students cheap PCs, then go to walmrt and buy a 1.5GHz linux PC (perhaps with a discount from walmart) and solicit donations of used monitors...
Posted by (6 comments )
Link Flag
I agree "US First"
We live in NYC and my son is in high school as a junior and has yet to touch a computer there. In grammar school there were pc's in every classroom yet in high school they are reserved for the higher academics only. Thats a disgrace. The U.S. first is what the tax payers in this country expect.
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
I agree with you
We need to help the "financially challenged" in
OUR OWN COUNTRY first and foremost. Once that
is done, then we can move forward and help other
countries. Let's not forget the victims of
hurricanes Katrina and Rita, many of these
survivors lost everything they had, including
PC's, laptops, monitors, printers, and PDA's.
The majority of these folks do not have property
insurance and therefore do not have the
financial resources to replace this equipment.
Technology will enable people to regain some
semblance of normalcy in their lives. The crank
powered laptop would be especially helpful in
the event of a power outage. Let's support our
own BEFORE we can even BEGIN to think of meeting
the technology needs of the rest of the world!
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
What about *OUR* students?
Forget about the world for a minute. What about *OUR* poor,
*OUR* students? I say tackle issues at home first. I'm damned
sick, as an american, of hearing all of the effort we're pouring
into countries abroad, when we've got high school graduates
who routinely can't read. No Child Left Behind doesn't work,
most students still don't have adequate access to technology
that's becoming more and more a requirement. And we're not a
third world country.

Most schoold districts here don't have enough qualified tech
people, many businesses here complain of a lack of qualified
techs HERE. So let's start there.
Posted by (14 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Americans do have access to technology.
I don't believe in the so-called digital divide. We live in a country where you can buy a $100 used PC & monitor with dial-up internet access. For $100 on eBay you could buy a 500MHz Emachine with a 17" monitor if you can pick it up instead of paying to ship it. The $100 laptops are going to be SOLD in poor countries, not given away as an act of government charity. Plus, in America we spend way too much money on education. We spend more than any other country but we have the educational level of Pakistan.
Posted by lingsun (482 comments )
Link Flag
yeah, what about them...
don't be sick of efforts to help the world -- they need to go on. america, on the whole, enjoys privileges most people will never know. there's plenty of wealth and brains to go around. a reader above mentioned used PCs -- for the students here, this is much more apropos - easy to ship and usually a bit more powerful. the problem in the us is that the efforts to bring cheap PCs to kids here still use winblows and office; a critical factor in keeping PCs cheap is keeping the software costs down, can't be done. here's an idea: get a grant for giving underprivileged students cheap PCs, then go to walmrt and buy a 1.5GHz linux PC (perhaps with a discount from walmart) and solicit donations of used monitors...
Posted by (6 comments )
Link Flag
I agree "US First"
We live in NYC and my son is in high school as a junior and has yet to touch a computer there. In grammar school there were pc's in every classroom yet in high school they are reserved for the higher academics only. Thats a disgrace. The U.S. first is what the tax payers in this country expect.
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
I agree with you
We need to help the "financially challenged" in
OUR OWN COUNTRY first and foremost. Once that
is done, then we can move forward and help other
countries. Let's not forget the victims of
hurricanes Katrina and Rita, many of these
survivors lost everything they had, including
PC's, laptops, monitors, printers, and PDA's.
The majority of these folks do not have property
insurance and therefore do not have the
financial resources to replace this equipment.
Technology will enable people to regain some
semblance of normalcy in their lives. The crank
powered laptop would be especially helpful in
the event of a power outage. Let's support our
own BEFORE we can even BEGIN to think of meeting
the technology needs of the rest of the world!
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
market share
150 million by 2007, and it will run Linux. That alone would give Linux maybe 20% of the world PC market.
Posted by Eduardo1234565 (10 comments )
Reply Link Flag
150 million by 2007?? MAYBE 1.5 million...
I just don't think the sales projections are anywhere close to reality. In many countries people are struggling just to have enough to eat. I can't see why people will see a $100 laptop as some magic ticket to a better life.
Posted by lingsun (482 comments )
Link Flag
market share
150 million by 2007, and it will run Linux. That alone would give Linux maybe 20% of the world PC market.
Posted by Eduardo1234565 (10 comments )
Reply Link Flag
150 million by 2007?? MAYBE 1.5 million...
I just don't think the sales projections are anywhere close to reality. In many countries people are struggling just to have enough to eat. I can't see why people will see a $100 laptop as some magic ticket to a better life.
Posted by lingsun (482 comments )
Link Flag
Exciting Opportunity for American Kids
I'm sure mistakes will be made along the waydesign,
distribution, tech support, etc., but I'm excited about this
project. In the 1st world we see children out-pacing adults in
technological literacy, and I imagine this will be even more
extreme in the 3rd world.

How will African, Egyptian, Thai kids go about "learning the
computer"? Mostly on their own, without much help from
adults. They will benefit from not having their imaginations
stunted by technology-jaded adults. What kind of virtual
communities will they develop? How will they reach out to their
1st world peers? How many American 8 year olds are going to
start up friendships with these 3rd world kids? How might their
relationships develop into innovative, problem-solving
collaborations?

How many American kids are going to start wanting to learn
Linux so they can work on projects with other kids around the
world?
Posted by (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Linux for the masses...
... is coming... and it's mobile... :D
Posted by Mendz (519 comments )
Link Flag
exciting indeed
Mr. Ferguson, your statements are quite true and exciting. I concur wholeheartedly. I would only hope that this blurs the lines of racism even more. Global collaboration.
Posted by paranormal69 (4 comments )
Link Flag
Exciting Opportunity for American Kids
I'm sure mistakes will be made along the waydesign,
distribution, tech support, etc., but I'm excited about this
project. In the 1st world we see children out-pacing adults in
technological literacy, and I imagine this will be even more
extreme in the 3rd world.

How will African, Egyptian, Thai kids go about "learning the
computer"? Mostly on their own, without much help from
adults. They will benefit from not having their imaginations
stunted by technology-jaded adults. What kind of virtual
communities will they develop? How will they reach out to their
1st world peers? How many American 8 year olds are going to
start up friendships with these 3rd world kids? How might their
relationships develop into innovative, problem-solving
collaborations?

How many American kids are going to start wanting to learn
Linux so they can work on projects with other kids around the
world?
Posted by (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Linux for the masses...
... is coming... and it's mobile... :D
Posted by Mendz (519 comments )
Link Flag
exciting indeed
Mr. Ferguson, your statements are quite true and exciting. I concur wholeheartedly. I would only hope that this blurs the lines of racism even more. Global collaboration.
Posted by paranormal69 (4 comments )
Link Flag
Still way too expensive for the billion poorest people in the world.
Still way too expensive for the billion poorest people in the world. They're better off getting used PCs from the west.
Posted by lingsun (482 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Maybe people is going too far...
Most people are missing the point here. The proyect is aimed for developing countries; DEVELOPING. Not to the poor countries that have bigger problems to solve(starvation, diseases, etc.). Here in my country(a developing one) we do have a computer-culture. You can find in each corner cafes with computer usage(broadband included) about USD 0.50 an hour. So here in developing IS an opportunity for this. Even adults could fell in love with this proyect. Laptops are not cheap, so having a personal system for carrying to work and home in about $100 is a blessing for many. The people in Africa have bigger problems to solve; they may not care about having a laptop for doing homework and communicate with other people, as here in Latin America where is poorness, but a big computer culture. I think that the proyect could be a great success; it depends of the "people" they want to reach. Latin America could be the best option for the beginning.
Posted by Cesar Santamaria (4 comments )
Link Flag
Why Not Try BOOT and Bartering Programs!
Why not try out Building, Ownership, Operating and Transfer of Technologies (BOOT) to developing countries; also, bartering programs (possibly increased outsourcing) as a way out the social and economic doldrums that under-developed and developing countries sometimes find themselves in; in this way they may be able to affford more than a $100 computer - even perhaps an auto!
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Link Flag
Nah...
It's the cheapest ever if ever... Even the elite would want to own one. Looks good... imagine going out camping or mountain climbing with it... amazing crank power... wow!
Posted by Mendz (519 comments )
Link Flag
Used PCs?
Brilliant idea. Send some used PCs (and don't forget to include a couple of miles of extension cords for each PC).
Posted by haugland (5 comments )
Link Flag
the money will not come from donations and government funds
ummm, yeah right those handcrankable dells that are all the rage. you know, the ones with hard drives that never die and really low power consumption.
Posted by (6 comments )
Link Flag
Power cost and availability
A lot of those poor probably couldn't afford the power to run those old PCs, provided that power is available. Plus they would need places to put the hardware, which might be difficult if they are living on the streets or in cardboard shacks.
Posted by Generalist3001 (9 comments )
Link Flag
Still way too expensive for the billion poorest people in the world.
Still way too expensive for the billion poorest people in the world. They're better off getting used PCs from the west.
Posted by lingsun (482 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Maybe people is going too far...
Most people are missing the point here. The proyect is aimed for developing countries; DEVELOPING. Not to the poor countries that have bigger problems to solve(starvation, diseases, etc.). Here in my country(a developing one) we do have a computer-culture. You can find in each corner cafes with computer usage(broadband included) about USD 0.50 an hour. So here in developing IS an opportunity for this. Even adults could fell in love with this proyect. Laptops are not cheap, so having a personal system for carrying to work and home in about $100 is a blessing for many. The people in Africa have bigger problems to solve; they may not care about having a laptop for doing homework and communicate with other people, as here in Latin America where is poorness, but a big computer culture. I think that the proyect could be a great success; it depends of the "people" they want to reach. Latin America could be the best option for the beginning.
Posted by Cesar Santamaria (4 comments )
Link Flag
Why Not Try BOOT and Bartering Programs!
Why not try out Building, Ownership, Operating and Transfer of Technologies (BOOT) to developing countries; also, bartering programs (possibly increased outsourcing) as a way out the social and economic doldrums that under-developed and developing countries sometimes find themselves in; in this way they may be able to affford more than a $100 computer - even perhaps an auto!
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Link Flag
Nah...
It's the cheapest ever if ever... Even the elite would want to own one. Looks good... imagine going out camping or mountain climbing with it... amazing crank power... wow!
Posted by Mendz (519 comments )
Link Flag
Used PCs?
Brilliant idea. Send some used PCs (and don't forget to include a couple of miles of extension cords for each PC).
Posted by haugland (5 comments )
Link Flag
the money will not come from donations and government funds
ummm, yeah right those handcrankable dells that are all the rage. you know, the ones with hard drives that never die and really low power consumption.
Posted by (6 comments )
Link Flag
Power cost and availability
A lot of those poor probably couldn't afford the power to run those old PCs, provided that power is available. Plus they would need places to put the hardware, which might be difficult if they are living on the streets or in cardboard shacks.
Posted by Generalist3001 (9 comments )
Link Flag
Cooper Union Students
I am currently working with other students in an Engineering and Design class at The Cooper Union For The Advancement of Science and Art. Our project for the semester is designing a computer for the masses: In particular, designing a computer that is low-priced and that provides access to the internet.

This article was forwarded to our class by our professor.

It is great to see the strides that are being made in this area, as I believe it to be one of the most important developments/projects of our time. Knowledge is power after all.

Good luck to all of those involved.

JD
Posted by (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Cooper Union Students
I am currently working with other students in an Engineering and Design class at The Cooper Union For The Advancement of Science and Art. Our project for the semester is designing a computer for the masses: In particular, designing a computer that is low-priced and that provides access to the internet.

This article was forwarded to our class by our professor.

It is great to see the strides that are being made in this area, as I believe it to be one of the most important developments/projects of our time. Knowledge is power after all.

Good luck to all of those involved.

JD
Posted by (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Its Nice.
Well I was impressed by the 4 type of utility of this product. Even you spend 2000 bucks you don't get Laptop and tablet combine. MIT start selling customized version of this product in market will be a great hit.
Posted by hemen thacker (42 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Its Nice.
Well I was impressed by the 4 type of utility of this product. Even you spend 2000 bucks you don't get Laptop and tablet combine. MIT start selling customized version of this product in market will be a great hit.
Posted by hemen thacker (42 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Amazing...
It looks like that laptop is more aestheticly appealing than the $1200 Dell Inspiron notebooks. Frankly i'd buy one just because of the crank letting me recharge it on the go.
Posted by jer2eydevil88 (29 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Amazing...
It looks like that laptop is more aestheticly appealing than the $1200 Dell Inspiron notebooks. Frankly i'd buy one just because of the crank letting me recharge it on the go.
Posted by jer2eydevil88 (29 comments )
Reply Link Flag
That's right, but
The billion poorest people are not footing the bill. The country buys the $100 laptop and distributes them to the citizens.
Posted by (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
That's right, but
The billion poorest people are not footing the bill. The country buys the $100 laptop and distributes them to the citizens.
Posted by (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Even So!
What guarantees are there that corrupt governments and individuals in some of these under-developed and developing countries would not exploit the poorer classes in their countries. Then again, why not place these responsibilities in the hands of the "United Nations" (even the oil producing and exporting countries such as Nigeria and others) since I believe they have the resources to adequately implement such programs; as if we have forgotten the victims of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on our own doorsteps already. Why not put your own house in order first! As the saying goes... self preservation is the first rule of nature.
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Even So!
What guarantees are there that corrupt governments and individuals in some of these under-developed and developing countries would not exploit the poorer classes in their countries. Then again, why not place these responsibilities in the hands of the "United Nations" (even the oil producing and exporting countries such as Nigeria and others) since I believe they have the resources to adequately implement such programs; as if we have forgotten the victims of hurricanes Katrina and Rita on our own doorsteps already. Why not put your own house in order first! As the saying goes... self preservation is the first rule of nature.
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Poor nations children need a school and a teacher first!
The concept of making a $100.00 Laptop is a nice idea, but there is a flaw in the logic. What good are laptops for children who have no school or teacher? What good is school if these children don't have food, clean water, clothing and shelter! This is another prime example of the priveleged (MIT student) with unrealistic perspectives. Hey, if ther're hungry, how about we "let them eat cake" while we're at it! Moron!
Posted by gibsonelliot (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Seriously...
How about $100 water filtration systems MIT? Poor nations do not need laptops and WiMax, they need the necessities: food, water, shelter. I can see them now..."Im hungry and these flies won't leave me alone but look I have new e-mail." I do not think these people have the correct perspective on the state of the impoverished. I think they just said they were going to use it for third world nations in an effort to sound humanitarian and facilitate the acquisition of funding.

On another note...I wouldnt mind purchasing one of these. :)
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Here is the point
The point of producing this lap top is that it eliminates the ABSOLUTE necessity of a teacher. By providing access to the internet we are in turn providing the oppurtunity for education where there wasn't one allready. Instead of not having the oppurtunity to learn we are putting the choice of education in each families' home. While every one may not use this to the full capabilities it presents, think of all those that may. Than try to argue your view point.
Posted by (4 comments )
Link Flag
Speaking of flawed logic...
>>What good are laptops for children who have no school or teacher? What good is school if these children don't have food, clean water, clothing and shelter! This is another prime example of the priveleged (MIT student) with unrealistic perspectives.<<

The flaw in your logic is that these machines aren't targeted at the people that they won't help. They aren't destined for those who don't have food and water. They are targeted at developing countries. Other projects target poverty and hunger, this one targets education. This is what you offer people once they have food and water and are healthy enough to sit up and take mental nourishment.

What does it mean that you don't understand this? Been eating too much cake? Claim the twinkie defense. It worked for Dan White...
Posted by Lynn_S (52 comments )
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Poor nations children need a school and a teacher first!
The concept of making a $100.00 Laptop is a nice idea, but there is a flaw in the logic. What good are laptops for children who have no school or teacher? What good is school if these children don't have food, clean water, clothing and shelter! This is another prime example of the priveleged (MIT student) with unrealistic perspectives. Hey, if ther're hungry, how about we "let them eat cake" while we're at it! Moron!
Posted by gibsonelliot (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Seriously...
How about $100 water filtration systems MIT? Poor nations do not need laptops and WiMax, they need the necessities: food, water, shelter. I can see them now..."Im hungry and these flies won't leave me alone but look I have new e-mail." I do not think these people have the correct perspective on the state of the impoverished. I think they just said they were going to use it for third world nations in an effort to sound humanitarian and facilitate the acquisition of funding.

On another note...I wouldnt mind purchasing one of these. :)
Posted by (2 comments )
Link Flag
Here is the point
The point of producing this lap top is that it eliminates the ABSOLUTE necessity of a teacher. By providing access to the internet we are in turn providing the oppurtunity for education where there wasn't one allready. Instead of not having the oppurtunity to learn we are putting the choice of education in each families' home. While every one may not use this to the full capabilities it presents, think of all those that may. Than try to argue your view point.
Posted by (4 comments )
Link Flag
Speaking of flawed logic...
>>What good are laptops for children who have no school or teacher? What good is school if these children don't have food, clean water, clothing and shelter! This is another prime example of the priveleged (MIT student) with unrealistic perspectives.<<

The flaw in your logic is that these machines aren't targeted at the people that they won't help. They aren't destined for those who don't have food and water. They are targeted at developing countries. Other projects target poverty and hunger, this one targets education. This is what you offer people once they have food and water and are healthy enough to sit up and take mental nourishment.

What does it mean that you don't understand this? Been eating too much cake? Claim the twinkie defense. It worked for Dan White...
Posted by Lynn_S (52 comments )
Link Flag
Hilarious
this is hilarious! we've gone from mit labs to the 3rd world to american inner cities to the linux gospel revival tent to the microsoft satanopoly to the latin american drug trade and it's "gringo" customers and i'm not even halfway through the comments yet! LMAO!!!
Posted by J_Satch (571 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Talking about being hilarious!
What about the countries such as Iran, Iraq (one of the largest oil producing countries in the world), North Korea who have developed or were on the verge of developing weapons of mass destruction... to "nuke" who! (If they destroy food production in other people's countries... how will they survive) when they are not producing enough food to feed themselves. What if they were to change their ways of policies and donate a part of those savings to help feed, clothe and house the less fortunate countries; also, some of these savings can go towards helping to pay for the $95. computer and the American military savings (from having to police the world) can go towards building schools and hospitals for the needy in these developing and under-developed countries in Africa and elsewhere.
Posted by Captain_Spock (894 comments )
Link Flag
Got to giggle...
I found it interesting that the first response was how this bit of technology wasn't addressing world hunger and the lack of potable water.

That guy obviously need to read C|Net a many more hours each day and get others to do so too so that food and water will be distributed more equitably to the disadvantaged. Reading and critiquing tech news on the Internet will save the downtrodden if we can just get everyone to do it. Except for the people that would be getting thses laptops that is...
Posted by Lynn_S (52 comments )
Link Flag
 

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