October 13, 2004 12:46 PM PDT

SCO to launch legal Web site

The SCO Group plans to launch a Web site to chronicle its legal battles relating to Unix and Linux, as part of an effort to counterbalance Groklaw.net--which was set up to poke holes in the company's legal claims.

The site, to be called Prosco.net, will feature an archive of legal filings, hearing dates and SCO positions on various matters, spokesman Blake Stowell said Tuesday. The Lindon, Utah-based company plans to launch the site by Nov. 1, he said.

"The site will be designed to be informational for people desiring to follow the company's litigation. We've received a lot of feedback from people saying, 'I would like to follow what's going on, but I would prefer to not have to visit Groklaw,'" Stowell said.

Groklaw, run by paralegal Pamela Jones, provides legal filings and detailed analyses of SCO's legal cases with IBM, Novell, AutoZone, DaimlerChrysler and Red Hat. It's popular with open-source fans who generally disparage SCO's legal attack.

Jones runs Groklaw as an amateur project, with assistance from contributors who report on court hearings, provide commentary and transcribe legal files into searchable text. But Groklaw led to a paid offshoot: A start-up called Open Source Risk Management hired Jones to compile a history of Unix intellectual property for a project called Grokline.

SCO argues that IBM copied proprietary Unix technology into open-source Linux, violating its contract with SCO. Big Blue rejects the charge and has countersued with three claims of patent infringment. SCO's suits haven't seemed to have slowed the spread of Linux.

Unlike Groklaw, SCO won't let others post their opinions on its site, Stowell said.

2 comments

Join the conversation!
Add your comment
Sounds like SCO
<quote>Unlike Groklaw, SCO won't let others post their opinions on its site, Stowell said.</quote>
ummm hmmmmm... Wouldn't want any public opinions would we?

Makes as much sense as:
<quote>We've received a lot of feedback from people saying, 'I would like to follow what's going on, but I would prefer to not have to visit Groklaw,'" Stowell said.</quote>

SCO; going, going....
Posted by (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
SCOX getting desperate
This so called information website will be nothing more than a propaganda source, and smacks of desperation in Lindon.

Groklaw is successful because it offers legally informed dissection of SCOX's preposterous claims, and all of the court transactions and documents.

After all this time, SCOX have not shown one iota of proof af any of their claims, and their only "victory" in a court has been the dubious one of being allowed to further investigate why it took so long for one of their extortion targets to reply. Even Blepps' infamous briefcase has disappeared, as has Blepp himself.

Groklaw allows reader input, discussion and commentary, but a lot of it is noise and distraction. SCOX apparently aren't even going to allow that.

Most interestingly, SCOX were explicitly told by a judge NOT to try their case(s) in the media. I fail to see how this web site can be interpreted any other way.

Remember that Groklaw is NOT associated with IBM or SCOX - it is independent - as are the lamlaw and tuxrocks sites.
Posted by (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

Join the conversation

Add your comment

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Click here to review our Terms of Use.

What's Hot

Discussions

Shared

RSS Feeds

Add headlines from CNET News to your homepage or feedreader.