October 18, 2006 7:46 AM PDT

MySQL introduces Community Server database

Database company MySQL announced on Tuesday changes designed to appeal to both developers and corporate customers.

It introduced a subscription service, called MySQL Enterprise Server, that includes a new database monitoring service along with regular updates and support.

In addition, the company released MySQL Community Server, which is geared specifically toward open-source developers who want to get the latest updates and contribute fixes to the database code.

Until now, MySQL has offered the same database in both a free version and one that included support services and a commercial license.

To better serve both individual developers and corporate customers, the company decided to create two editions and launch a Web site, MySQL Forge, dedicated to open-source developers.

"With this differentiation, we aim to better serve both categories of MySQL users--those who are willing to spend time to save money, and those who are willing to spend money to save time," said Kaj Arno, the company's vice president of community, in a blog posting explaining the changes.

The new arrangement is designed to make it easy for open-source developers to share information among themselves and communicate with the main MySQL database developers employed by the company.

The MySQL Enterprise offering contains the same database but includes a contract for technical support. With the release, MySQL is introducing its Monitoring and Advisory Service, which is meant to automate many tasks that database administrators do.

In a blog posting, RedMonk analyst Stephen O'Grady said that the different editions should allow MySQL to better address conservative corporate customers as well as open-source developers, who help drive adoption of products.

"MySQL Community gives MySQL the ability to relax some of those (licensing) restrictions and better incorporate outside contributions in a free product," O'Grady wrote.

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MySQL, open-source developer, corporate customer, Stephen O'Grady, database company

 

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