February 27, 2007 4:25 PM PST

Music executives judge Jobs, lament losses

NEW YORK--The discussions at a music conference here Tuesday started with an all-around bashing of Apple CEO Steve Jobs before moving to the plethora of issues plaguing the music industry.

Apple, digital rights management (DRM) and the public's willingness to pirate music were discussed, debated and lamented once more by attendees of the Digital Music Forum East conference.

"We're running out of time," Ted Cohen, managing director of music consulting firm TAG Strategic, told the roughly 200 attendees. "We need to get money flowing from consumers and get them used to paying for music again."

The call to arms by Cohen, who was moderating a panel discussion titled "The State of the Digital Union," comes as the music industry suffers through one of the worst slumps in its history.

CD sales fell 23 percent worldwide between 2000 and 2006. Legal sales of digital songs aren't making up the difference either. Last year saw a 131 percent jump in digital sales, but overall the industry still saw about a 4 percent decline in revenue.

That has the industry pointing fingers at a number of things they believe caused the decline.

At the opening of the conference, some of the panel members lashed out at Jobs. Members said Jobs' call three weeks ago for DRM-free music was "insincere" and a "red herring."

"Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats," Jobs wrote in a letter that rocked the music industry. "In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat."

Jobs' position was perceived by many in the music industry as a 180-degree shift in direction. The view expressed at the conference is that Apple has maintained a stranglehold on the digital music industry by locking up iTunes music with DRM.

Cohen told the audience that if Jobs was really sincere about doing away with DRM, he would soon release movies from Disney--the studio Jobs holds a major stake in--without any software protection. An Apple representative declined to comment on Tuesday on remarks made by the panel.

Panel member Mike Bebel, CEO of Ruckus music service, said: "Look, I don't think anybody is necessarily down on Apple. The problem is the proprietary implementation of technology...and it's causing everybody else who is participating in the marketplace--the other service providers, the labels, the users--a lot of pain. If they could simply open it up, everybody would love them."

The role of DRM
Panel members--who included Thomas Gewecke, Sony BMG senior vice president, and Gabriel Levy, general manager of RealNetworks Europe--were divided about what the music industry should do about DRM in general.

Most of the panel members, save for Greg Scholl, CEO of independent music label The Orchard, believe that some form of DRM is necessary.

Scholl said flatly that DRM doesn't work. "The idea that DRM gives us choice isn't right," he said.

"The economics of the business are over for good and aren't ever going to be the way they were before," Scholl said. This is a position that some in the music industry are starting to warm up to.

In January, EMI said it was reviewing a request by the Electronic Frontier Foundation to allow reverse engineering of its digital rights management software. That EMI would even consider the proposal was seen in many circles as a step forward by the anti-DRM camp.

Gewecke also defended record labels against the criticism that the music industry has its head in the sand and just doesn't understand the Digital Age. He said that Sony BMG is working with technologists and retailers, and is constantly is looking for technological solutions to some of the industry's problems.

He also said that despite all the bad news, there's plenty for the sector to be encouraged about.

"We routinely talk to companies about what's different," Gewecke said. "We're constantly looking for where value is being created in a business model. We are being flexible. There's still an evolution that has to happen. I say it's an optimistic time considering there's more music being listened to now than ever before. There's more opportunities to monetize the music. We want to be out there looking for new ideas and companies."

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91 comments

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inept music mogles
These music idiots have totally lost it. They remind me of the
robber barrons of the early 19th centry. How can we stick it to the
consumer, and everyone else that listens to music. And they
wonder why people pirate music. Hey Dipstick music guys... move
ahead with the inevitable.., music free of DRM, or be left in the
scrap heap of history with the 45's 33's and 8 tracks. Get a clue.
Posted by smithjones (103 comments )
Reply Link Flag
inept music moguls
These music idiots have totally lost it. They remind me of the
robber barrons of the early 19th centry. How can we stick it to the
consumer, and everyone else that listens to music. And they
wonder why people pirate music. Hey Dipstick music guys... move
ahead with the inevitable.., music free of DRM, or be left in the
scrap heap of history with the 45's 33's and 8 tracks. Get a clue.
Posted by smithjones (103 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Spoiled children
... are what they are.

They know waht they want, which is to squeeze the consumer off every possible cent, keeping him buying the same music over and over if he cares to listen to it, pay the artists in peanuts if they can get away with it, and go riding around in big limos surrounded by teenage wannabees.

What they don't know is how to make that happen anymore...
Posted by MichaGato (25 comments )
Link Flag
The problem is the music.
The problem is the music.
Posted by leriksen71 (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Music from the big companies turned me off
I hate it all. MTV, VH1, Radio, & commercial music sites. You turned me off 100% You try to taunt me with bands of some new flavor every friken fall, and I know your going to make sure it's not even available to listen to it.

I am just turned off by all of them. I'm sticking to old favorites, and looking on indie labels & online indie online stations, because I'm really sick of you guys being spoilers.

Bah!
Posted by bradyme (43 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Don't blame Jobs or DRM...it's the Music!!!
As a tech saavy 41 year old I buy all my music via iTunes and I DO
NOT steal music from other sources. The reason I don't buy more
music has nothing to do with DRM or Steve Jobs...it's the lack of
original and entertaining music. In a world of homogenized emo/
alt/boy bands and girl acts (a'la Gwen, Jojo, Fergie, Avril, etc) that
are hardly discernable from one another it's hard to get invested in
the music scene. Find something good and original and the
consumer will follow.
Posted by poma3 (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
Word Too Big - Discernable
Thanks for typing the reply I was crafting as I read the article. Unfortunately you probably lost most of the people who care about the music industry by using the word "discernable". I suspect that the executives, ha that?s a joke, of the music companies these days do not understand many words with more than two syllables.
Posted by Im-Not-TED (21 comments )
Link Flag
What???
Blame Apple for the music industry woes? Are they on crack?! Apple, and it could've been any company, made a (lucrative) business model to curb plummeting music sales and rampant piracy using a flexible DRM, and they are getting bashed?

Why don't they blame the technology for the compact disc? If we were still using cassette tapes or 8-tracks, this would be fine, right?

These guys are ridiculous.
Posted by SteenMachine (50 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Today's music sucks for the most part
The problem is as has been said the music. The corporation forgot that a large part of their market is the baby boomers, I being one myself, and I am not aware of too many if any boomers that like rap. In fact most people older than 18 probably don't like it. The industry is relying and focusing too much on one segment that the majority of people actually despise and they can't figure out what's wrong. Hehehehe. The best music ever made was made between 1965 and 1975 roughly. I suggest the media companies go back and figure out what made that music great and recapture that magic if they want to make money. They can blame poor sales on P2P all they want but it was never the problem.
Posted by js33 (12 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Plenty for you to like...
...Just look--and listen! Come out of your musical cave once in
a while. There was also a lot of crap released between 1965 and
1975l.
What happened is that the baby boomers forgot to teach their
kids basic ethics. Downloading pirated music is like a little
white lie these days.
Evolve buddy! Most of anything anywhere anytime--sucks.
Posted by LuvLoogie (6 comments )
Link Flag
That said...
I mainly agree with your point. Let's discuss '65-'75. List what
you like, and I'll suggest some current additions to your
collection.
Posted by LuvLoogie (6 comments )
Link Flag
Yes, today's music truly blows...
but the best music wasn't made between 1965 and 1975 (except for that Oh blah di oh blah dah song, that's a timeless classic). It was written between 1650 and 1827.

Pop music today is engineered to the exact specifications of the music industry. Each "act" consists of small numbers of individuals with no specific talent or skill performing simple mindless ditties which are better suited to electronic reproduction than to live performance. Imagine if you had to replace Beyonce with 67 virtuoso performers. After salaries and production costs, there wouldn't be much room for profit.
Posted by mn39202 (32 comments )
Link Flag
We're not the target market
Music is marketed to teenagers and early twenty-somethings. They have the disposable cash to waste on crappy pop music. Ironically, they're also the demographic most likely to pirate music. Adults have mortgages, car payments, kids, IRA payments, and so on, so we don't spend on music. So the music industry isn't interested producing music for us. If the music industry is smart, they'll start putting money into promoting musicians for the demographic who's willing to pay for their product.
Posted by jd1023948 (47 comments )
Link Flag
Sony
Not just the music sucks. Would you buy anything from Sony after the rootkit fiasco? Would you buy anything that came with a label that siad it would not play in your computer / car / whatever / DVD player? Would you buy something for $1.99 that you could only play on one computer? That if your hard drive fried would vanish into thin air? Wait till somebody else ripped it and then borrow it. Even promise to give it back when you are finished it it make you feelk better.
Posted by gggg sssss (2285 comments )
Link Flag
Web radio
I buy from iTunes a bit, but listen to the huge variety on Live365
for about $4 something a month. Suits me just fine. Hope the
artists are making at least something from that.
Posted by billmosby (536 comments )
Reply Link Flag
You like web radio? . . .
Try pandora.com
It's free and you create your own stations based on the artist you
like to listen to.
For example you can set up the "Jack Johnson" station and it will
play not only J.J. but many other artists of the same style or
genre and you can decide if you like or dislike the new artist.
You can also set up the:
"Jack Johnson/Black Eyed Peas/Modest Mouse/Radiohead/Janes
Addiction/Red Hot Chili Peppers" station
or the
"Beatles/Rolling Stones/Led Zepplin/Van Halen/Eric Clapton/Bob
Dylan" station.
Or what ever combination you like or even genre you like and it's
free!

Disclaimer:
I do not nor have I ever been an employee of Pandora.com ;-)
Posted by K.P.C. (227 comments )
Link Flag
Not quality of music, QUANTITY
You just CAN'T talk about quality of music these days....it's
begging for an argument, and rightfully so. Every generation's
music is always the best music ever, live with it.

The problem is instead the vast amount of artists that are signed
each year, and get a half-assed marketing plan that relys
entirely on the strenth of the first single. With so many new
artists appearing every week, consumers are confused and
choose just to sample a little of everything, just buy singles
instead of the whole album. That's fine for Apple, they love the
business. But labels don't make money for singles, they make
money from the physical CD's being bought (mostly because
they are COMPLETELY screwing over the artist).

But I agree that these industry leaders are clueless. Don't come
down on Jobs, learn a god damn lesson from him, and watch
sales increase ten fold like apple has since the beginning of their
online music store.
Posted by Goodman.seth (15 comments )
Reply Link Flag
well, take a look...
...at www.bmuze.com. lots of indie artists, no DRM, and free sharing/embedding of music similar to youtube.

(yes, this is a shameless plug)
Posted by jeremy.pickett (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Over 90% is DRM Free.
Every CD is DRM free.

As Jobs asked, why do they insist on DRM for online sales, but not for the 90+% of music sold on CD?
Posted by open-mind (1027 comments )
Reply Link Flag
and over 90% of music download is free
forget DRM.. there is so much music available for download on peer to peer networks which had no DRM.. its in MP3 format to be played anywhere and everywhere...
Posted by Thomas_74 (9 comments )
Link Flag
Correction
All real CDs are DRM free. Some CDs are not true redbook and do have some form of DRM.
Posted by ddesy (4336 comments )
Link Flag
What music execs really need is...
a way to monetize thousands of people downloading illegal content all around the world, forget the business models, even if you start selling your online songs for 5 cents.. why would any one pay for it when I can get it off bitTorrents for free.. and not only high quality - DRM free music, every thing from Television shows (some of them even before it airs on TV), Movies, Softwares ,Games, Books, Magazines, etc.. everything is available on BitTorrents.. MiniNova.org alone claims billions of file downloads, and that volume speaks a lot... Mininova is just one such site out of 100's more out there which catalogs torrents... this is a huge market.. millions of people all around the globe downloading files .. figure out a way to monetize this traffic.. market to these people, if they download your song, go and throw a concert in that town, or city and make money off it... i think all you guys need to do is think outside the bun (i mean the box).. Peace..
Posted by Thomas_74 (9 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Who has time?
I love music. I have hundreds of CD's and thousands of songs in
my music library. What I don't have is time to listen to them all
anymore. Music is but one of many entertainment choices I
have and when I'm not working I just don't have the time to be
listening to the music I own. Why would I buy more? I have a
$14.01 credit on my iTunes account and it's been there forever.
I haven't found anything I want to buy (any suggestions?: I like
alt like radiohead, nin, u2 and jazz).
Why buy music when I have internet radio, I listen to public radio
in my car and If I wanted it, satellite radio.
The music execs need to figure out a way to give customers
something for their money other than the music. When people
buy collectible albums it's not due to the music, it's do to the
collectible. Give me something worth collecting and I might
spring for it even if I already own the music. Disney does it with
DVD and I bet their are people who have several copies of the
same movie in different packages with different extras. Do the
same thing with music and maybe customers will show some
interest.
Oh, and lower the prices.
Posted by hal Summers (80 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Who has time?
I love music. I have hundreds of CD's and thousands of songs in
my music library. What I don't have is time to listen to them all
anymore. Music is but one of many entertainment choices I
have and when I'm not working I just don't have the time to be
listening to the music I own. Why would I buy more? I have a
$14.01 credit on my iTunes account and it's been there forever.
I haven't found anything I want to buy (any suggestions?: I like
alt like radiohead, nin, u2 and jazz).
Why buy music when I have internet radio, I listen to public radio
in my car and If I wanted it, satellite radio.
The music execs need to figure out a way to give customers
something for their money other than the music. When people
buy collectible albums it's not due to the music, it's due to the
collectible. Give me something worth collecting and I might
spring for it even if I already own the music. Disney does it with
DVDs and I bet there are people who have several copies of the
same movie in different packages with different extras. Do the
same thing with music and maybe customers will show some
interest.
Oh, and lower the prices.
Posted by hal Summers (80 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Guaranteed wages for ... ?!
The music industry and its execs follow a weird line of thought:
"we are part of a (capitalist) market economy, hence we are
guaranteed to make profits (whatever business model we apply)
... and if not a (any) law has to be established which forces
society to give us the money we deserve (according to our
business plan, not according to any products or services we
deliver).

This sounds like a socialist call for guaranteed wages for
everybody ... except that: "this time round it is only for the
music execs -- sorry, mate"
Posted by ptroxler (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
I wonder if...
...the dinosaurs roared and bellowed at the skies darkening over their heads. I wonder if they raged against the falling temperatures and tried to stamp on the irritating mammals scurrying around their feet. "What we need," said one allosaur to another, "is a way make all these bad things unhappen. Get on it." I think the music industry's attempts to turn back time will meet with similar success.
Posted by JFDMit (180 comments )
Reply Link Flag
...
good analogy
Posted by coconinoite (27 comments )
Link Flag
Keep Whining Away Music Industry
You give us lewd pop, hip-hop, and more garbage than at any other time. If you want to "revive" the music industry get rid of MTV, BET, and VH1 and start moving back into music like you get from Buble, Norah Jones, etc. You have no one to blame but the artists themselves and you who support that garbage and absolute filth that comes from those like Akon, Beyonce, J Timberlake, and Nelly Furtado.

These musicians have used their many talents and opportunities to produce great music...but instead have embraced music that reaks of rotting garbage. One Hundred Percent of what you're seeing mr and mrs music executive is a crowd unwilling to buy up the stinking trash.
Posted by swiftouch (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
a bunch of exe.wankers
what a pocket sized CD?

oh yeah, denius - death to apple...
Posted by SamoUmer (8 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Music Distribution
One thing that I think the digital music conference should be discussing is the fact that in an industry where the consumer is capable of constantly increasing their demand for the product the overall sales are in decline even though there is constant positive innovation in the product going on.
We can consume an infinite amount of music and there is a significant segment of consumers always willing to try new stuff so we know that the problem is not with the consumer demand. There are simply excellent artists producing great music everyday all over the world (we don?t necessarily get them all on our radar screen). There is always something new that we like so we know that the issue is not with the product. The issue lies in the distribution. The industry has simply got it WRONG. Either they take steps to fix the distribution system or they will continue to see declining sales.
I am 44 years old so have seen, records, cassettes and CD's. Now we are in the era of digital music yet someone who used to buy records, cassettes and CD's no longer purchases music. Don't get me wrong, I love music but I refuse to buy it under the current conditions.
I share the vision of Steve Jobs when he says "Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats," Jobs wrote in a letter that rocked the music industry. "In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat."
The industry may think that suing its own (potential) customers is a good idea but it seems to me that this is a clear sign that there is something seriously wrong. While I can understand the industry?s apprehension regarding piracy if music was distributed DRM-free, I cannot agree with the approach being taken today.
Perhaps the whole music industry business model has to be re-examined. If the volume was there then the cost per minute (or byte, or song) of music could come down to a reasonable level where the whole question of piracy becomes irrelevant since there won?t be any. If the price is right a consumer will always buy the genuine article rather than take a pirated copy with no guarantee of quality.
The only question in my mind is how to create a distribution system that enables the cost of music to scale downwards with increasing volume. Changes in the marketing of music will also have to occur with lower cost yet more effective marketing techniques being employed. The marketing and distribution does not have to be limited to the online medium alone. I for one have many views on how the revenue per square foot of existing music retailers (and other players in the retail landscape) can be enhanced while reducing the distribution and inventory holding costs. Of course as long as the industry is not willing to move to DRM-Free distribution nothing can be implemented.
Will we still have mega stars making mega bucks in this new world of DRM-Free music? The answer is quite simply yes however a significant portion their earnings may not come from the sale of the music alone.
So I suppose in short the question is whether or not those who control the industry have the courage to change, to listen to their customers and to do the right thing so we all start buying music again.
Will someone please lead the way!!
Posted by foliekue (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
This is good...
You have made a acurate and deep assessment of the question.

For the music exec's is time to face the facts: they're expendable, no the artists. The artists are the one's who should get rich, and they could on cents per song, video, etc...
Posted by MichaGato (25 comments )
Link Flag
state of the music industry
blaming the technology companies is off the mark. content owners control DRM rules and if they recognize they are not the solution, they are the ones to take the decision to remove them. this isn't rocket scientry, it's the music business.
Posted by kosmofenster (6 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Hey Buy direct from the Artist!!
Thats what I do, bypassing the pin-brained greedy music
companies and their execs. And most of the music I like cannot
be found in either pirated or legal downloadable form! OK I have
eclectic tastes, but you would be amazed at what is offered for
sale direct from the artists websites, and its good karma since
the artists get paid as well.

At 48, I have bought records (33, 45 and 78), cassettes, and
OMG 8-tracks! I do believe that the music offered in recent
times is really commoditised. For me the best music was from
1965 to about 1985, do there!
Posted by redison (19 comments )
Link Flag
Some DRM Can Be Useful
No one is talking about digital watermarking. This would allow
Apple, Microsoft and Real to encode their songs in plain old mp3
format, but still keep track of the music files, right? And you can
play them on ANY mp3 player.

I won't even get into what I feel about Steve Jobs' statement, but
I'll tell you this: As much as I like my Mac, I would like to be able
to use a service other than iPod+iTunes. And I'd love to be able
to have hte flexibility that Windows-users have with online
content. (Although some of that is Microsoft's fault for not
making their DRM compatible with Macs; the other rests on
Apple's shoulders for not allowing content distributors the
ability to access FairPlay cleanly.)

Digital watermarking seems like a good way to allow both Mac
and Windows-users the ability to access the same content, if I
understand it correctly. Help me out with this, folks. Here's an
article: <a class="jive-link-external" href="http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/" target="_newWindow">http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/</a>
20070227-8937.html
Posted by toosday (343 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Lack of creativity in music business and Chicago's story
My frustration with the music industry, besides the inability to embrace the current technology, lies with their unwillingness to allow for creativity from artists. So many have been pigeonholed into one type or genre of music, and there is not any room for crossing over. This is so unlike what I consider the golden age of popular music, the late 1960s and early 70s.

To see my point, all you have to do is look at the brilliant output from Chicago from 1969 to 1976, to what they are doing now. From 1967, when they started (They celebrate their 40th Anniversary this year, along with the Doors) to 1974, they were one of the most sophisticated, but also one of the most serious rocking, outfits going. They, along with Led Zeppelin, dominated the early and mid-70s musical landscape in the pre-disco days.

Chicago employed a three-vocalist system, and the horn section was fully integrated into the rest of the music, instead of just being background or punctuation. In this way, they revolutionized horns in popular music, and wound up selling five number one albums in a row. They had become a pioneering jazz-pop-rock fusion band that dabbled in just about all genres of music. They had even earned the respect of old masters such as Duke Ellington, who had them on one of his shows late in his life. Even the great Jimi Hendrix admired them to the point where he was the one who gave them their first big tour.

Now, with their original lead guitarist dead, their original drummer fired, and their original lead vocalist / bass player performing solo, they are now in a rut they haven't been able to get out of.

Why?

Part of it is because of the aforementioned losses. However, I think the biggest part is due to the fact the record companies want them to continue doing "ballads", where they got typecast in the 1980s, despite their success. Part of it has to do with the record companies not willing to allow the kind of creativity that was once Chicago's hallmark.

Thus, when they came out with Chicago XXX last spring, it was not very well received. It was front-loaded with ballads and then had some more daring(?) cuts on the tail end. They even dabbled with some country-tinged tunes, due to the fact they worked with Rascal Flatt's Jay DeMarcus, and the Rascal Flatt's band performed with them on one of their single releases, "Love Will Come Back".

It is long past time to allow bands to start expressing more creativity, and perform the kinds of music they enjoy making. To me, it is the gatekeepers, the record companies and commercial radio, which is holding artists back. Chicago themselves back in the mid-90s even tried to break out of their "ballad" mode with the never released Stone of Sisyphus (even some songs have made it onto compilations and the recording became a bootleg classic), but the record company they were with at the time told them to go back and make some ballads. Chicago, to their credit, told them to take a hike.

The popular music world needs to embrace a new era of creativity, where both old and new artists can express themselves fully. It happened before, and it can happen again.
Posted by Larry Launstein Jr (13 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Chicago
Wow! They're up to XXX? I didn't even know they were still making
albums ... er CDs.

I agree with the premise ... it's the gatekeepers that are holding
music back. And these gatekeepers ... the music industry in
particular ... are the most ardent advocates of DRM.
Posted by calpundit (69 comments )
Link Flag
Evil Music Industry needs to clean up it's act
After the immoral music industry pushed licentious rap noise on the youth for the last 15 years or so, they now are amazed these same people copy and distribute their "product" without paying them. What did they think was going to happen? This is a case of "you reap what you sow". As a musician, there is a tremendous amount of excellent music being made these days. This music is given little or no promotion. The record companies should promote a more wholesome better quality "real" music as opposed to the evil Rap/Hip-hop garbage they have pushed on kids for quite sometime.Putting the welfare of kids before your profit is the right thing to do and will ultimately make you more money.
Posted by boboplex (1 comment )
Reply Link Flag
Revenge of the customer
Why wasn't the fact that the RIAA is filing lawsuits by the 1000's brought up by the execs when they were wondering why their sales are dropping off. For any RIAA members out there, here is why people don't buy your products.

1) Law suits by the 1000's. People are voting with their wallets. You're just too blind to see it.

2) Sony Rootkits.

3) 90% of the music you put out stinks, 9% of is is mediocre, and 1% is worth buying. You can't make a profit with quality like that.

4) People who like music would rather buy straight from the artist than through a bunch of do-nothing slackers like the RIAA. I'll send a musician $20 for a home pressed CD with no art, no packaging and no ad buget, but I wouldn't pay the RIAA a penny. I'd speculate that muscians lose sales because their label is a member of the RIAA.

5) RIAA acts like they own the music. You keep wanting to tell me that I can't do this or that with music I purchase, and try to enforce this with DRM. You don't own the music, you didn't create it, you don't add any value to the music I buy. I refuse to touch music that's crippled by your ideas of DRM, and wouldn't download DRM music even if it were free.

6) Your contracts with artists are a travesty. Just once I want to hear you justify things like 'breakage' for digital sales.

7) Unethical behavior. Just where does the money you get from the people you sue go anyway? Have any artists ever seen a penny of the millions you're pulling in from lawsuits?

8) RIAA SWAT. Every time I see news shots of people in law enforcement style windbreakers with RIAA and stories of how the RIAA assisted in the 'break of dawn, guns drawn, shots almost fired' seizure of computers from some person you've accused of violating a copyright, I'm reminded of why I refused to by products from RIAA members. The thought that you're wasting the time of real law enforcement types with such things is pretty sickening. I'd much rather the law enforcement types work on real crime.

9) DMCA.

10) Blank media taxation. Adding levies to blank media just because it might be used in ways that you don't approve has probably cost you 10 times in ill-will what you receive in monies. Oh..and where does this money go? How many artists have seen a dime of this money you collect in their names?

A big music fan, A bigger RIAA enemy.
Posted by feliusrex (48 comments )
Reply Link Flag
re: Revenge of the customer
Well said!
Posted by smlinde (16 comments )
Link Flag
People who purchase todays music are as much of a moron as music executives
Have these overpaid worthless executives ever notice that once they forced DRM into the world (remember PressPlay, what a joke!) music sales declined? Why don't these morons figure out that perhaps if they create some quality music more people will be willing to pay for it. All they want to do is wrap up their crap music with all these restrictions and actually think people will purchase it. Anyone who does is as big as a moron as the music executives.
Posted by bobby_brady (765 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Absolutely!
Maybe the reason CD sales are plummeting is because most of the music that is realeased today is really,really bad, the only good stuff is coming from veteran artists (which is fine) but that can't last forever.

I'm constantly amazed at the tripe that shows up in top 40s and the 'indie' (britpop) scene is just horrible, *metal fan btw*.

Record companies would sell more music, if there was good new stuff to buy.
Posted by grandmasterdibbler (78 comments )
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Today's Music
&gt; Why don't these &lt;deleted&gt; figure out
&gt; that perhaps if they create some
&gt; quality music more people will be
&gt; willing to pay for it

I couldn't agree with you more.

Don't get me wrong, I'm NOT saying that downloading music for free (unless it's legally free) is right in the least, but I've often times said to myself "how do they expect to sell this garbage" when I hear a new tune on the radio.

The quality of music has been going down the tubes for a long time, but the entertainment industry doesn't seem to notice that.

How convenient of them.

Charles R. Whealton
Charles Whealton @ pleasedontspam.com
Posted by chuck_whealton (521 comments )
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