April 27, 2006 7:51 AM PDT

Minitablets to gain considerable steam, researcher says

Despite the general shoulder shrugging that greeted the launch of the first Microsoft-based "ultramobile PCs," the minicomputers are still set to find a market, analysts believe.

According to In-Stat research, the number of devices shipped could rise to 7.8 million by 2011, driven by users looking for a data-centric mobile device beyond their cell phone.

Sales of minitablets will likely be hampered by the lack of appropriate processors, In-Stat said, with battery life failing to match the functionality demands of the devices themselves. However, both Intel and Microsoft--primary backers of the new form factor--have said they are working on extending the devices' average battery life.

The research company also suggested that ultramobile PCs will need to appeal to certain consumer niches. "There is no one-size-fits-all solution for all market segments," it said.

The first minitablet--the Q1 from Samsung--is set to go on sale in the United Kingdom on June 1, carrying a $1,440.86 (799 pound) price tag. The device will be launched in the United States on Monday, though a specific shipping date has not been announced.

Jo Best of Silicon.com reported from London.

See more CNET content tagged:
minitablet PC, ultramobile PC, researcher, Intel, battery

2 comments

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Microsoft just doesn't get it!
In my opinion, the only reason the tablet PC never really took off is the fact it is too expensive for the budgets of most consumers who would benefit from such a device ie: college students and small businesses. The Origami project will suffer the same fate if it is unable to achieve a price point sufficient to support those who can benefit from it the most.

Another thing, what exactly seperates this form factor from the pocket PC? The PPC does most everything Origami is attempting to do and employs all the advantages of being highly compact, feature rich and battery friendly...
Posted by pilaa (253 comments )
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Microsoft just doesn't get it!
In my opinion, the only reason the tablet PC never really took off is the fact it is too expensive for the budgets of most consumers who would benefit from such a device ie: college students and small businesses. The Origami project will suffer the same fate if it is unable to achieve a price point sufficient to support those who can benefit from it the most.

Another thing, what exactly seperates this form factor from the pocket PC? The PPC does most everything Origami is attempting to do and employs all the advantages of being highly compact, feature rich and battery friendly...
Posted by pilaa (253 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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