May 4, 2005 12:38 PM PDT

Million-resume madness in India

BANGALORE, India--Want a job at Infosys Technologies, the Indian high-tech giant? Get in line.

The company received a million applications for employment last year, according to a company spokeswoman. The IT services company hired 10,000--1 percent of all applicants.

India's experiencing a high-tech boom similar to what the United States saw in the 1990s. Leading companies are seeing revenue and profits double every two years, while a number of start-ups are scrambling to attract venture capital funding. Salaries increase by about 18 percent annually for software developers in the country, and job hopping is rampant. The country's university system, however, produces 300,000 engineers annually, so finding a job in a top company remains a challenge.

Infosys campus

Infosys, of course, is one of the local Big Three, along with Tata Consultancy Services and Wipro. Starting salaries at these companies can range from 15,000 to 25,000 rupees a month or more, which translates to $4,300 to $7,200 a year. $8,000 is also often given as a starting salary figure. The job also comes with prestige.

But just as important as salary, Infosys is a garden of sanity amid the congested zaniness of Bangalore. Exiting polluted and crowded Hosur Road, one enters a fantasyland. Employees walk, ride free bikes or take complimentary golf carts to get between the 41 buildings on the 70-acre wooded campus. Before going to work, employees hired straight out of universities spend 2.5 months in training to learn "soft skills" such as customer communication in Mysore, a few hundred miles away.

The lush clipped grounds include a putting green, a swimming pool, table tennis, pool tables, cafeterias and a mirrored building shaped like one of the pyramids. Recent visitors include British Prime Minister Tony Blair and the premier of China.

The grounds also include a garden where trees planted by international luminaries such as Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates stand. One of the trees was planted by Lawrence Summers, president of Harvard, whose recent hypothesis that women may not be as good at math as men because of genetic differences drew a lot of U.S. media attention. Summers' comments never hit Indian newspapers, the spokeswoman said.

9 comments

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Hope they enjoy the ride while it lasts
Yup. Looks like the tech wave of the 90's moved from the US to India. It'll not last there either. As more and more demands for engineers continues to drive up the costs and salaries, the wave will move to the next lower cost country with similarly skilled engineers, and they'll be where the US is now.

What nobody seems to want to realize or talk about is that the US standard of living is draining over to the second and third world nations, and will continue to do so until the standards of living equal out. Such is the reality of this global economy.

The same can and will happen in India.
Posted by InetUser (28 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Hope they enjoy the ride while it lasts
Yup. Looks like the tech wave of the 90's moved from the US to India. It'll not last there either. As more and more demands for engineers continues to drive up the costs and salaries, the wave will move to the next lower cost country with similarly skilled engineers, and they'll be where the US is now.

What nobody seems to want to realize or talk about is that the US standard of living is draining over to the second and third world nations, and will continue to do so until the standards of living equal out. Such is the reality of this global economy.

The same can and will happen in India.
Posted by InetUser (28 comments )
Reply Link Flag
This has been twenty-five years in the making, and billions of dollars have been spent moving the high-tech sector to India. That's in addition to the billions spent in moving industry to China. I don't see that drastic knowledge-drain happening from India to any other part of the world, in fact, the global corporations are increasing their investment in India.
Jobs follow investments, and the Asian financial press has been making announcements of American computer companies investing in India and China since the late 80s. It got going full-bore in the 90s, and by 2000, the companies that Indians had started in the US, taking advantage of venture capital and a rich talent base, picked and moved to India.
If those jobs were to move from India, it takes a generation to do, and we would see the starting of it now, and we aren't.
Posted by MargaretBartley (5 comments )
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What?!
They are making 8000$ a year? I'm making 200$, maybe 250$ in short time, and I'm making more than my mother. And they don't even pay taxes for me, and it's not like I'm not working.I thought they are cheap!
Posted by orfeu_niko (104 comments )
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Salaries in India
A tech graduate with no experience in India usually earns between $3000-$10000 - depending on the company and teh university he graduted from. Salaries rise sharply thereafter though - an IT company employee could earn anywhere from $10,000 to $30,000 an year if he has 5 years of experience. Of course there are exceptions and some get paid less and some get paid even more. It ultimately depends on the productivity per employee of the company - which in most cases is 2.5x the employee salary. still, this is at best 15-30% of what similar employees earn in the West.
Posted by (12 comments )
Link Flag
What?!
They are making 8000$ a year? I'm making 200$, maybe 250$ in short time, and I'm making more than my mother. And they don't even pay taxes for me, and it's not like I'm not working.I thought they are cheap!
Posted by orfeu_niko (104 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Salaries in India
A tech graduate with no experience in India usually earns between $3000-$10000 - depending on the company and teh university he graduted from. Salaries rise sharply thereafter though - an IT company employee could earn anywhere from $10,000 to $30,000 an year if he has 5 years of experience. Of course there are exceptions and some get paid less and some get paid even more. It ultimately depends on the productivity per employee of the company - which in most cases is 2.5x the employee salary. still, this is at best 15-30% of what similar employees earn in the West.
Posted by (12 comments )
Link Flag
Starting salary ??? Totally wrong statistics provided
The starting salary quoted by CNet ($15000 to $25000) is off by a huge huge margin. The starting salaries are about $6000. CNet can confirm it with the freshers there or may be the universities which Infosys visits for recruiting.
Posted by aayushpuri (3 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Starting salary ??? Totally wrong statistics provided
The starting salary quoted by CNet ($15000 to $25000) is off by a huge huge margin. The starting salaries are about $6000. CNet can confirm it with the freshers there or may be the universities which Infosys visits for recruiting.
Posted by aayushpuri (3 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

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