May 23, 2008 6:45 AM PDT

Microsoft's backward route to ODF support

Microsoft's decision to add support to Office 2007 for the OpenDocument Format instead of its own OOXML office file format is due to backward-compatibility issues with OOXML, it has emerged.

Microsoft announced Wednesday that it will support ODF version 1.1 in the release of Office 2007 Service Pack 2 (SP2), scheduled for the first half of 2009. The company will also support PDF and XPS in Office 2007 SP2. OOXML, or Office Open XML, is partially supported in the current version of Microsoft's office productivity suite and, according to Microsoft's announcement, will not be fully supported in Office until the release of "Office 14," which as yet has no confirmed release date.

In Microsoft's announcement, the company said it is adding native support for ODF due to increasing pressure from customers "and because we want to get involved in the maintenance of ODF." The company now says OOXML support will require substantially more work.

Microsoft pushed OOXML through as a fast-track ISO standard, and OOXML became IS29500 in April. However, Microsoft on Thursday told ZDNet UK that the changes OOXML had gone through in the ISO ratification process made it more difficult to support OOXML than ODF in Office 2007.

"We already substantially support IS29500"--the OOXML specification that was recently approved by ISO/IEC members--"in Office 2007 and we've announced our plans to update that support in the next version of Office, code-named Office 14," a Microsoft representative said. "The ISO/IEC standardization process resulted in a number of changes to the Open XML specification. While developing our support for ODF requires a substantial amount of work, changes to existing file formats are often more complex than developing new code and therefore more difficult to implement due to backwards compatibility considerations."

Microsoft's director of standards, Jason Matusow, said Microsoft deciding to support ODF was not about one format beating another.

"This is not about any one document format 'winning'--it is about enabling customers to evaluate and use document formats that make the most sense for them," Matusow wrote in a blog. "It is that we want our customers to have the most positive experience possible when using our product."

Matusow added that Microsoft will continue to participate in Open XML, ODF, PDF, and XPS working groups.

"I know that the skeptics are going to spin theories about MS participation in these groups--but the reality is that we want the specs to continue to improve over time and facilitate interop(erability)," wrote Matusow.

One organization that has been skeptical about Microsoft's interoperability moves in the past has been the European Commission. Following controversy over Microsoft's conduct in pushing through OOXML as an ISO document standard, the Commission announced that it will probe OOXML as part of its ongoing antitrust investigation.

On Thursday, the Commission said it had "taken note" of Microsoft's ODF announcement and would investigate whether the move will improve interoperability.

"The Commission would welcome any step that Microsoft took towards genuine interoperability, more consumer choice, and less vendor lock-in," the Commission said in a statement. "In its ongoing antitrust investigation concerning interoperability with Microsoft, the Commission will investigate whether the announced support of ODF in Office leads to better interoperability and allows consumers to process and exchange their documents with the software product of their choice."

Some members of the open-source community were also skeptical about Microsoft's motives. Mark Taylor, founder of the Open Source Consortium, said Microsoft had "no choice" but to support ODF. He pointed to Becta, the U.K. government's adviser on IT in education, this year advising schools not to implement Vista due to interoperability issues. According to Taylor, pressure from the Commission and other policy makers has forced Microsoft's hand.

CONTINUED: No choice?…
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6 comments

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Hey Microsoft; you have announced Wednesday that you "will support ODF version 1.1 in the release of Office 2007 Service Pack 2 (SP2), scheduled for the first half of 2009". So, when are you going to add support for ODF Version 1.2? Huh!
Posted by Commander_Spock (3123 comments )
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Nobody, not even Microsoft can implement and support OOXML fully.

It is not a standard by any rational definition, buying people off to ignore the proprietary references, contradictions and incomplete specification doesn't count.

Imagine that, a 6000 page format specification and it is incomplete! Only in Redmond.
Posted by The_Decider (3097 comments )
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"Microsoft only does things when it has absolutely no choice"

Exactly!

"Microsoft's not supporting OOXML until Office 14 was "very strange""

Actually, it is not strange at all and I doubt it ever will see the light of day. It is too flawed for use.
Posted by The_Decider (3097 comments )
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Flying "The CONCORDE" commercially - Again!

Re: "One organization that has been skeptical about Microsoft's interoperability moves in the past has been the European Commission. Following controversy over Microsoft's conduct in pushing through OOXML as an ISO document standard, the Commission announced that it will probe OOXML as part of its ongoing antitrust investigation.

On Thursday, the Commission said it had "taken note" of Microsoft's ODF announcement and would investigate whether the move will improve interoperability.

"The Commission would welcome any step that Microsoft took towards genuine interoperability, more consumer choice, and less vendor lock-in," the Commission said in a statement. "In its ongoing antitrust investigation concerning interoperability with Microsoft, the Commission will investigate whether the announced support of ODF in Office leads to better interoperability and allows consumers to process and exchange their documents with the software product of their choice..." Yup; well, it is like this, assuming all the "technical" standards (noise levels, NDT et cetera, et cetera are met) we now move to the financial and the economic; so, where are the "snapshots" of the past "financial" and "economic" performances (Analysis and Reporting, Decision-Methods...) of "The CONCORDE'S operations"? Are they in REDMOND; or, somewhere in the EU???. Now, welcome to the "1998" Interoperability Standards Party in 2008 "Redmond". :-D :-$
Posted by Commander_Spock (3123 comments )
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Re: "Welcome to the "1998" Interoperability Standards Party in 2008 - "Redmond". Now, considering this CNET NEWS article; re: "Biofuels and food prices: Running the numbers..." The question is: On which OEM's "Standardized" Productivity Office Suite are these "financial" and "economic numbers" now being "run" if presently there is no native Microsoft Office support for ODF Standards et al.

Do ya all remember this famous election campaign slogan - "It Is The Economy -........."! Substituting "the Interoperability" for "the Economy"!
Posted by Commander_Spock (3123 comments )
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Microsoft almost always tries to disable non MIcrosoft progams by using standards different from everyone else! A true internet, that has easy access fo all, will never be possible without a single standard.

There is an answer. I use it to read, post and even view video online. It is called Linux!

Mark Heinemann
Posted by as901 (105 comments )
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