April 3, 2006 9:00 PM PDT

Intel flashes ahead to 1Gb memory

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Intel's flash memory division is set to double the density of its largest chip by moving to the company's latest manufacturing technology.

Samples of Intel's first 65-nanometer NOR flash memory chip will be available this quarter. Mobile phone vendors will be able to start using them in large quantities by the end of the year, said Brian Harrison, vice president and general manager of Intel's flash memory group. The new flash memory chips will be able to hold one gigabit (Gb) of data, up from the 512Mb of data stored by its current 90-nanometer flash chips, he said.

Intel will be able to sell 2Gb NOR chips by using its stacking technology, Harrison said. By the time it moves to its 45-nanometer technology, it should be able to cost-effectively produce 2Gb chips, he said.

Flash memory is used in mobile phones, PDAs and other embedded devices to store data without the constant supply of electricity needed for DRAM or the moving parts of a hard drive. NOR memory has traditionally been the memory of choice for mobile phones due to its reliability and short read-times.

NAND memory has come on strong, however, as memory cards and other devices take advantage of its density and fast write speeds. NAND memory is expected to produce 69 percent of all flash memory revenue in 2006, whereas in 2004 it accounted for 45 percent, according to data from iSuppli.

Intel is addressing the NAND market through a joint venture with Micron Technology. Sales of MP3 players like Apple's iPod nano and Shuffle have helped push the NAND market, and Apple is one of the first customers for Intel and Micron's joint venture.

See more CNET content tagged:
NAND, flash memory, density, Micron Technology Inc., memory chip

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What NAND and NOR is, logically
for those who are not familiar with logic circuits, there are three basic functions... AND, OR, and NOT. In an AND, all inputs must be true for the output to be true. In an OR, only one input must be true for the output to be true. A NOT is simple change of true to false or false to true. When an AND and NOT are combined, it's refered to as a NAND (when all inputs are true, the output is false, or AND then NOT). A NOR circuit is an OR then NOT.

When you apply that to the memory, it's defining what type of logical circuit is used to comprise the core of the memory circuits and not what type of transistor or substrate materials are used in the manufacture.
Posted by Seaspray0 (9714 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Thanks
I appreciate the fact you took the time to explain memory types to
the less technologically informed amongst us. I find it so annoying
(and perhaps condescending?) when a "news article" fails to do so.
Posted by zhenkaixin (2 comments )
Link Flag
What NAND and NOR is, logically
for those who are not familiar with logic circuits, there are three basic functions... AND, OR, and NOT. In an AND, all inputs must be true for the output to be true. In an OR, only one input must be true for the output to be true. A NOT is simple change of true to false or false to true. When an AND and NOT are combined, it's refered to as a NAND (when all inputs are true, the output is false, or AND then NOT). A NOR circuit is an OR then NOT.

When you apply that to the memory, it's defining what type of logical circuit is used to comprise the core of the memory circuits and not what type of transistor or substrate materials are used in the manufacture.
Posted by Seaspray0 (9714 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Thanks
I appreciate the fact you took the time to explain memory types to
the less technologically informed amongst us. I find it so annoying
(and perhaps condescending?) when a "news article" fails to do so.
Posted by zhenkaixin (2 comments )
Link Flag
 

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