March 31, 2006 4:00 AM PST

H-1B visas hit roadblock in Congress

(continued from previous page)

The H-1B cap has fluctuated over the years, peaking at 195,000 between 2001 and 2003 but reverting to lower levels starting in 2004. The allotment for visas had already been reached by the first day of the 2005 fiscal year and six weeks before the start of fiscal year 2006, drawing renewed outcry from technology companies over worker shortages. Congress has already approved an additional 20,000 slots for foreign master's or Ph.D. graduates of U.S. universities.

Groups such as the IEEE-USA, which represents American electrical and electronics engineers, have argued that the system is used not to bring in the best and the brightest foreign talent, but to pay them lower wages than their U.S. counterparts.

David Huber, a computer network-management specialist based in Chicago, told politicians at Thursday's hearing that he had firsthand experience with such displacement. Describing himself as a senior-level employee "whose life has been devastated by the H-1B program," Huber detailed two instances in which he had applied for positions that were later offered to foreign workers--in one case, at a salary he claimed was $30,000 less than the market rate.

Rep. Lamar Smith, a Texas Republican, said he was concerned that certifications along the lines of what his colleague suggested would be unenforceable and ineffective. He suggested it might make most sense to keep the H-1B program as an option for employers but institute a "sliding cap that will decrease over time so we will not shut out homegrown American workers."

CNET News.com's Declan McCullagh contributed to this report.

Previous page
Page 1 | 2

See more CNET content tagged:
H-1B, worker, Rep., Apple Computer, president

237 comments

Join the conversation!
Add your comment
Rich get richer and American labor gets nothing
This idea hurts the U.S. economy in the long run. The middle class is very slowly getting squeezed to death by cheaper foreign labor. In the short run a few executives and stock holders get rich. These companies want young, cheap, EXPENDABLE labor. Experienced, older American skilled labor is being underutilized and thrown away.

Back in 2003 after a trip to D.C., the head of the graduate IT department at UNCC told us there were 14,000 IT pros unemployed in NC alone. The problem is not lack of ability in America. The problem is that American business wants to treat workers as throwaway resources. Many older IT pros and engineers would gladly take deep pay cuts to stay in their field, but American bosses just refuse to believe it.

It is a myth that American workers aren't willing to be competitive. Salary level is not the key issue for older workers - location is. Ask me to take a pay cut, but don't expect me to move my family 2000 miles for job with no job security. Young, foreign workers have no clue that they are going to be used and thrown away in a few years.

I would eliminate all visas and give tax incentives to companies to train American workers to do the jobs that they claim they are having trouble filling. Better yet, tax American companies every time they outsource an American job.

I tell every young college student that I see that they should forget technology and major in something that can't be outsourced.
Posted by (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
A job that can't be outsourced?
That's easy. Become a lawyer and/or a politician.
You can't offshore those jobs.

;-)
Posted by dargon19888 (412 comments )
Link Flag
Foreign workers have no clue is wrong
You are wrong about the assertion that foreign workers have no clue that they are going to be used and thrown away. Most foreign workers know that employees user their services, when in need and let them go when it is not needed. Because of this, foreign workers are good at adopting to changing needs.

Native worker or foreign worker will always find job in united states provided they are ready to adapt to changing needs. Adapting also => moving where the job takes!!

Advising people against studying sceince or math is not a good thing. America is built on technology and innovation. We should all encourage our kids to study science and math.
Posted by Tanjore (322 comments )
Link Flag
Rich get richer and American labor gets nothing
This idea hurts the U.S. economy in the long run. The middle class is very slowly getting squeezed to death by cheaper foreign labor. In the short run a few executives and stock holders get rich. These companies want young, cheap, EXPENDABLE labor. Experienced, older American skilled labor is being underutilized and thrown away.

Back in 2003 after a trip to D.C., the head of the graduate IT department at UNCC told us there were 14,000 IT pros unemployed in NC alone. The problem is not lack of ability in America. The problem is that American business wants to treat workers as throwaway resources. Many older IT pros and engineers would gladly take deep pay cuts to stay in their field, but American bosses just refuse to believe it.

It is a myth that American workers aren't willing to be competitive. Salary level is not the key issue for older workers - location is. Ask me to take a pay cut, but don't expect me to move my family 2000 miles for job with no job security. Young, foreign workers have no clue that they are going to be used and thrown away in a few years.

I would eliminate all visas and give tax incentives to companies to train American workers to do the jobs that they claim they are having trouble filling. Better yet, tax American companies every time they outsource an American job.

I tell every young college student that I see that they should forget technology and major in something that can't be outsourced.
Posted by (5 comments )
Reply Link Flag
A job that can't be outsourced?
That's easy. Become a lawyer and/or a politician.
You can't offshore those jobs.

;-)
Posted by dargon19888 (412 comments )
Link Flag
Foreign workers have no clue is wrong
You are wrong about the assertion that foreign workers have no clue that they are going to be used and thrown away. Most foreign workers know that employees user their services, when in need and let them go when it is not needed. Because of this, foreign workers are good at adopting to changing needs.

Native worker or foreign worker will always find job in united states provided they are ready to adapt to changing needs. Adapting also => moving where the job takes!!

Advising people against studying sceince or math is not a good thing. America is built on technology and innovation. We should all encourage our kids to study science and math.
Posted by Tanjore (322 comments )
Link Flag
Unlimited cap is the way to go
The jobs aren't being outsourced instead the companies are looking for the best and brightest and to draw the conclusion that its chaper labor I strongly disagree some of the people in this catogies went to school in North America and have an idea ho much their classmates are being paid and have the same level of training and experience as some of the Americans. So if a job was posted and a foreigner was hired I believe it is purely based on meritocracy.
Posted by lastnightout2000 (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
it is cheapest labor
why pay someone $150K a year when you can get it for $60k
Posted by baswwe (299 comments )
Link Flag
Try telling the truth...
H1-B visas were not originally used for "technology" in the IT field. They were used by the insurance industry years ago to specifically replace American workers. To make things worse, there is very little give back by corporate America expecially to American education; as a consequence, American education has suffered dramatically in the past few decades forcing higher education to seek forefign students with money to help keep their institutions afloat. Big Business in America is simply not giving a damn thing back ... and they are lying big time about their own productivity (check corporate earnings reports ... read their 10-b reports...overpaid incompetence in the board rooms). The greedy are gong to illiminate the concept of the Constitutional United States and this generation of Americans hasn't got a clue.
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Unlimited Caps
Immigration built this country. But, if you want to work here indefinitely then you should become a citizen. If you don't want to do that then simply go home. If your country is so great, what are you doing here? If Mexico valued it's citizens there would be a better life there and they wouldn't have to come here for jobs. They are bringing down the quality of life in our cities instead of making a better life here. They send their money home to Mexico. The Mexican government is a terrorist organization aiding and abetting the illegal infiltration of the U.S.
Posted by American 1st (5 comments )
Link Flag
Unlimited cap is the way to go
The jobs aren't being outsourced instead the companies are looking for the best and brightest and to draw the conclusion that its chaper labor I strongly disagree some of the people in this catogies went to school in North America and have an idea ho much their classmates are being paid and have the same level of training and experience as some of the Americans. So if a job was posted and a foreigner was hired I believe it is purely based on meritocracy.
Posted by lastnightout2000 (2 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Try telling the truth...
H1-B visas were not originally used for "technology" in the IT field. They were used by the insurance industry years ago to specifically replace American workers. To make things worse, there is very little give back by corporate America expecially to American education; as a consequence, American education has suffered dramatically in the past few decades forcing higher education to seek forefign students with money to help keep their institutions afloat. Big Business in America is simply not giving a damn thing back ... and they are lying big time about their own productivity (check corporate earnings reports ... read their 10-b reports...overpaid incompetence in the board rooms). The greedy are gong to illiminate the concept of the Constitutional United States and this generation of Americans hasn't got a clue.
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Unlimited Caps
Immigration built this country. But, if you want to work here indefinitely then you should become a citizen. If you don't want to do that then simply go home. If your country is so great, what are you doing here? If Mexico valued it's citizens there would be a better life there and they wouldn't have to come here for jobs. They are bringing down the quality of life in our cities instead of making a better life here. They send their money home to Mexico. The Mexican government is a terrorist organization aiding and abetting the illegal infiltration of the U.S.
Posted by American 1st (5 comments )
Link Flag
it is cheapest labor
why pay someone $150K a year when you can get it for $60k
Posted by baswwe (299 comments )
Link Flag
Outsource the Executives' Jobs ...
and you'll see the H-1B visa program go the way of the dodo overnight (although the competence level of Corporate America would probably go up several orders of magnitude). But, no, executives are self-selected by committees that are made up of - guess who? - executives on their companies' boards who are from friendly partner companies - the original self-licking ice cream cone.

After steady income growth and continuous employment as a software engineer for over 30 years, I wound up unemployed for over five months after being replaced by a cheaper, less-qualified foreign worker with an H-1B visa whom I had trained. When I finally did find a job, it came with a 20 percent pay cut, a 100-mile daily commute (up from less than 10), and I'm surrounded by lowball-paid foreigners, including my boss (and whom do you think they are going to favor in job interviews?). Every engineer I went to school with has had the same experience, and in several cases, they have been unable to get a technical job anywhere for years, reduced to trying to teach math and science to inner-city school kids, most of whom are only interested in becoming professional athletes, musicians, or drug dealers (before the race-rioters get their panties into a twist, this is what the kids have said - when taken on field trips for "career days", some rip off anything they can get their hands on to sell). This is the fault of the parents of the recalcitrants, of course, since they harbor the same illusions and impart nothing in the way of morality or principles.

Now, I've lived and worked overseas for over ten years, and loved every minute of it, making great friends everywhere, and I have no problem competing with foreigners, as long as the playing field is level (i.e., we have the same educational background and work experience that's appropriate to the job, the same communication skills, the same demonstrated teamwork and leadership abilities, etc., and are paid the same).

Just who do the executives think will be buying the products and services their companies are creating, if their consumers' incomes, if not their complete jobs, have been decimated? Oh, that's right, they'll have already moved on with their golden parachute severance packages, even after tenures of complete failure and incompetence, with the layoffs of fully-qualified citizens just a source of further bonuses for temporarily boosting profits.

The U.S. has been a success only because of the hard work of employees, and despite the stupidity of many executives. The only saving grace is that former executives are now selling themselves as consultants to companies in countries like China to teach them their "successful" business practices - given corporate and government corruption overseas, I'll give those companies about five years before they're even bigger pieces of toast than companies like Enron.

Despite the above, All the Best,
Joe Blow
Posted by Joe Blow (175 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Outsource
I'm all for outsourcing if we start with congress and the house! There is NO reason why we cant hire any of their jobs done in india for $100/month!!!
Posted by mlinder69-21063211865664677784 (36 comments )
Link Flag
Joe Blow has nailed it down tight!
Experience is perhaps the greatest evidence of truth. Joe Blow has both in his post.
Every American should be thoroughly "urinated-off". why they aren't terrorizes more than Osama. Is it possible the current gereation in power is so self-important, self centered, and narcissisistic that it may be that America will have to survive this generation in hopes that a better generation follows, if America is to survive at all?
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Yup Joe Blow has it right...
Welcome to American business!
If you're technical than you're not management material. If you look at the big picture, you're not management material.

If you have an IQ over 100, you're not management material. ;-)
Posted by dargon19888 (412 comments )
Link Flag
Outsource the Executives' Jobs ...
and you'll see the H-1B visa program go the way of the dodo overnight (although the competence level of Corporate America would probably go up several orders of magnitude). But, no, executives are self-selected by committees that are made up of - guess who? - executives on their companies' boards who are from friendly partner companies - the original self-licking ice cream cone.

After steady income growth and continuous employment as a software engineer for over 30 years, I wound up unemployed for over five months after being replaced by a cheaper, less-qualified foreign worker with an H-1B visa whom I had trained. When I finally did find a job, it came with a 20 percent pay cut, a 100-mile daily commute (up from less than 10), and I'm surrounded by lowball-paid foreigners, including my boss (and whom do you think they are going to favor in job interviews?). Every engineer I went to school with has had the same experience, and in several cases, they have been unable to get a technical job anywhere for years, reduced to trying to teach math and science to inner-city school kids, most of whom are only interested in becoming professional athletes, musicians, or drug dealers (before the race-rioters get their panties into a twist, this is what the kids have said - when taken on field trips for "career days", some rip off anything they can get their hands on to sell). This is the fault of the parents of the recalcitrants, of course, since they harbor the same illusions and impart nothing in the way of morality or principles.

Now, I've lived and worked overseas for over ten years, and loved every minute of it, making great friends everywhere, and I have no problem competing with foreigners, as long as the playing field is level (i.e., we have the same educational background and work experience that's appropriate to the job, the same communication skills, the same demonstrated teamwork and leadership abilities, etc., and are paid the same).

Just who do the executives think will be buying the products and services their companies are creating, if their consumers' incomes, if not their complete jobs, have been decimated? Oh, that's right, they'll have already moved on with their golden parachute severance packages, even after tenures of complete failure and incompetence, with the layoffs of fully-qualified citizens just a source of further bonuses for temporarily boosting profits.

The U.S. has been a success only because of the hard work of employees, and despite the stupidity of many executives. The only saving grace is that former executives are now selling themselves as consultants to companies in countries like China to teach them their "successful" business practices - given corporate and government corruption overseas, I'll give those companies about five years before they're even bigger pieces of toast than companies like Enron.

Despite the above, All the Best,
Joe Blow
Posted by Joe Blow (175 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Outsource
I'm all for outsourcing if we start with congress and the house! There is NO reason why we cant hire any of their jobs done in india for $100/month!!!
Posted by mlinder69-21063211865664677784 (36 comments )
Link Flag
Joe Blow has nailed it down tight!
Experience is perhaps the greatest evidence of truth. Joe Blow has both in his post.
Every American should be thoroughly "urinated-off". why they aren't terrorizes more than Osama. Is it possible the current gereation in power is so self-important, self centered, and narcissisistic that it may be that America will have to survive this generation in hopes that a better generation follows, if America is to survive at all?
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Yup Joe Blow has it right...
Welcome to American business!
If you're technical than you're not management material. If you look at the big picture, you're not management material.

If you have an IQ over 100, you're not management material. ;-)
Posted by dargon19888 (412 comments )
Link Flag
A US company will not hire anyone who can't do a job even if he works for 20K/year. You live in a market economy so do not complain that US corporate world is cutting costs.
Posted by koolio12345678 (1 comment )
Link Flag
It's easier to oursource with foreign born trainers
It's way easier to move your shop to India, if you already have a workforce that was born here in the U.S.

Another big reason why we need more h-1b visas is because hiring managers can't find enough friends to hire of the same ethnic background.

It's a form of discrimination, against U.S. citizens.

I've actually witnessed it, but for fear of losing my job, said nothing. And don't give me that whistle blowing bologne, you can't feed your kids on legal promises.

We don't need any more h-1bers, industry has been slow to use the more expensive H-1b visas (those for master degree from a U.S. university).

The value of the dollar is plummeting and soon Americans will be living like the 3rd worlders who work for food. When will Republicans get it? A good economy needs good jobs.
Posted by Jake Leone (143 comments )
Reply Link Flag
It's easier to oursource with foreign born trainers
It's way easier to move your shop to India, if you already have a workforce that was born here in the U.S.

Another big reason why we need more h-1b visas is because hiring managers can't find enough friends to hire of the same ethnic background.

It's a form of discrimination, against U.S. citizens.

I've actually witnessed it, but for fear of losing my job, said nothing. And don't give me that whistle blowing bologne, you can't feed your kids on legal promises.

We don't need any more h-1bers, industry has been slow to use the more expensive H-1b visas (those for master degree from a U.S. university).

The value of the dollar is plummeting and soon Americans will be living like the 3rd worlders who work for food. When will Republicans get it? A good economy needs good jobs.
Posted by Jake Leone (143 comments )
Reply Link Flag
It's really a contractors market, permanent jobs are scarce.
At my company we have only hired a few short term contractors. With No benefits, low hourly wage, and they can be fired on the spot, with no severence.

At the same time our stock prices has doubled, our profits have grown 1500%. So profits aren't being translated (very quickly) into U.S. jobs.

There are a lot of contract jobs out there right now (check Dice/monster) in the software industy, not nearly as many permanent positions. The employment boom is just a facade right now, it will take another year of good growth to cement these jobs as permanent.

Don't raise the cap and if the economy falters (and rising interest rates can do this), lower the cap.
Posted by Jake Leone (143 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Employers' problem
Who actually wants to be a contractor and risks to sit on the bench when the economy's down?

Contractors have to jump from one place to another every few months.
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Link Flag
It's really a contractors market, permanent jobs are scarce.
At my company we have only hired a few short term contractors. With No benefits, low hourly wage, and they can be fired on the spot, with no severence.

At the same time our stock prices has doubled, our profits have grown 1500%. So profits aren't being translated (very quickly) into U.S. jobs.

There are a lot of contract jobs out there right now (check Dice/monster) in the software industy, not nearly as many permanent positions. The employment boom is just a facade right now, it will take another year of good growth to cement these jobs as permanent.

Don't raise the cap and if the economy falters (and rising interest rates can do this), lower the cap.
Posted by Jake Leone (143 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Employers' problem
Who actually wants to be a contractor and risks to sit on the bench when the economy's down?

Contractors have to jump from one place to another every few months.
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Link Flag
How about this, H1B for foreigners graduated from US universities
They're educated here and graduated with graduate degrees. Give them easy ways to become American citizens, so employers have no way to push their salaries down.
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
How about this, H1B for foreigners graduated from US universities
They're educated here and graduated with graduate degrees. Give them easy ways to become American citizens, so employers have no way to push their salaries down.
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Reasons why H1-B is abused or misunderstood
It costs $2,000+ to apply for a H1-B and $8,000+ for a green card. Green card process takes FOREVER these days (6-8+ years).

H1-B workers can't play in the same battle field as American citizens. In the end, as weaker players, they are willing to take jobs with lower salaries.

Think, if they can easily become US citizens, do you think they still wanna take the cheap jobs and be cheap labors? Hey, who doesn't want more $$$???
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Reasons why H1-B is abused or misunderstood
It costs $2,000+ to apply for a H1-B and $8,000+ for a green card. Green card process takes FOREVER these days (6-8+ years).

H1-B workers can't play in the same battle field as American citizens. In the end, as weaker players, they are willing to take jobs with lower salaries.

Think, if they can easily become US citizens, do you think they still wanna take the cheap jobs and be cheap labors? Hey, who doesn't want more $$$???
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Do you know these tech founders were once foreigners?
Talented immigrants had a hand in founding Intel, Sun Microsystems, Yahoo, Google, eBay and other valley icons.
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
What the heck
are you talking about. There had to be the hardware technology first ... and it was NOT imported from overseas ... it was exported... . The science and engineering behind it was developed as a home grown product primarily, not shipped in. And so on. with-out there would be no SUN, No Microsoft (with a little cheating) and so forth. A lot of the countries we dealt with, and to a great extent still deal with today, do not practice an open policy with America ... it's a one way street. SO WHAT if a few foreigners benefitted. We also have the same talent here ... and we used to be not only the home of the brave and the land of the free, but the cradle of inovation. There aren't too many domestic people going overseas to find that.
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Do you know these tech founders were once foreigners?
Talented immigrants had a hand in founding Intel, Sun Microsystems, Yahoo, Google, eBay and other valley icons.
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
What the heck
are you talking about. There had to be the hardware technology first ... and it was NOT imported from overseas ... it was exported... . The science and engineering behind it was developed as a home grown product primarily, not shipped in. And so on. with-out there would be no SUN, No Microsoft (with a little cheating) and so forth. A lot of the countries we dealt with, and to a great extent still deal with today, do not practice an open policy with America ... it's a one way street. SO WHAT if a few foreigners benefitted. We also have the same talent here ... and we used to be not only the home of the brave and the land of the free, but the cradle of inovation. There aren't too many domestic people going overseas to find that.
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Hey folks, let's hear what the expert said:
Immigration? No, Competitiveness
In response to our post earlier this week on immigration, our in-house immigration expert, Sandy Boyd, VP of Human Resources Policy here at the NAM posted the following comment. We elevate it in case you missed it , because it's really good, explains why we're in this fight:

"It's not just about temporary visas (H1-Bs), it's also about green cards: a system plagued with backlogs and arbitrarily low caps too. More often than not companies want these very talented folks permanently but use H1-bs as a "work around" because the green card process is so slow and there is no direct path from advanced degree student to green card holder. The bill the Senate Judiciary Committee passed (and Majority Leader Frist's bill as well) understand the problem--and address all three pieces 1. Attracting the world best minds to our universities 2. Making the H1-B cap more market driven and 3. Fixing the green card system so that we can keep the world's best talent. While this may be labeled "immigration" reform, most employers who struggle to find enough engineers, researchers and scientists to keep work here is the United States have another word for it: competitiveness."

Source: <a class="jive-link-external" href="http://blog.nam.org/archives/2006/03/immigration_no.php" target="_newWindow">http://blog.nam.org/archives/2006/03/immigration_no.php</a>
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Sidagree with the post
This posting is a bit dishonest. One of the first companies to employ foregin workers under the H1-B work visas was AIG. there business was writing insurance, not technology. The net effect was to directly replace American workers (who contributed tax dollars and wealth to the United States for decades) with cheaper foreign workers, thus reducing the company's "costs" for the 90-day bottom line. It worked for the company. This company, like several others of the same ilk (and the insurance industry by federal statute is exempt from certain US Constitutuional provisions regarding diversity as well as anti-trust laws) did not do it for the "brightest and best" people --- an outright lie --- they did it to sabotage the American worker's wage base and standard of living, and to avoid taxation by deferring or eliminating certain taxes as a result of special tax credits etc.). It's a simple proposition ... tax avoidance, legally, and lowering wages. But this is not in America's best interests because the revenue costs (the bulk of spending of which benefits corporate America far more than the average citizen from Corporate agribusiness to hi-tech) are passed on to the average American in subsidized costs by increased local taxation, regulation costs and pricing mechanisms.

The plain truth is that these companies really do not want to reinvest in America or American education (look about you at our kids) but want to cheat the American people out of every dime they can get. Nothing new here. But let's not lie about the real purpose of H1-B visas: they are an attack on the economic stability of Americans and an end-run around our immigration laws. Globalization (an ill-defined term) simply means anarchy.
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Hey folks, let's hear what the expert said:
Immigration? No, Competitiveness
In response to our post earlier this week on immigration, our in-house immigration expert, Sandy Boyd, VP of Human Resources Policy here at the NAM posted the following comment. We elevate it in case you missed it , because it's really good, explains why we're in this fight:

"It's not just about temporary visas (H1-Bs), it's also about green cards: a system plagued with backlogs and arbitrarily low caps too. More often than not companies want these very talented folks permanently but use H1-bs as a "work around" because the green card process is so slow and there is no direct path from advanced degree student to green card holder. The bill the Senate Judiciary Committee passed (and Majority Leader Frist's bill as well) understand the problem--and address all three pieces 1. Attracting the world best minds to our universities 2. Making the H1-B cap more market driven and 3. Fixing the green card system so that we can keep the world's best talent. While this may be labeled "immigration" reform, most employers who struggle to find enough engineers, researchers and scientists to keep work here is the United States have another word for it: competitiveness."

Source: <a class="jive-link-external" href="http://blog.nam.org/archives/2006/03/immigration_no.php" target="_newWindow">http://blog.nam.org/archives/2006/03/immigration_no.php</a>
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Sidagree with the post
This posting is a bit dishonest. One of the first companies to employ foregin workers under the H1-B work visas was AIG. there business was writing insurance, not technology. The net effect was to directly replace American workers (who contributed tax dollars and wealth to the United States for decades) with cheaper foreign workers, thus reducing the company's "costs" for the 90-day bottom line. It worked for the company. This company, like several others of the same ilk (and the insurance industry by federal statute is exempt from certain US Constitutuional provisions regarding diversity as well as anti-trust laws) did not do it for the "brightest and best" people --- an outright lie --- they did it to sabotage the American worker's wage base and standard of living, and to avoid taxation by deferring or eliminating certain taxes as a result of special tax credits etc.). It's a simple proposition ... tax avoidance, legally, and lowering wages. But this is not in America's best interests because the revenue costs (the bulk of spending of which benefits corporate America far more than the average citizen from Corporate agribusiness to hi-tech) are passed on to the average American in subsidized costs by increased local taxation, regulation costs and pricing mechanisms.

The plain truth is that these companies really do not want to reinvest in America or American education (look about you at our kids) but want to cheat the American people out of every dime they can get. Nothing new here. But let's not lie about the real purpose of H1-B visas: they are an attack on the economic stability of Americans and an end-run around our immigration laws. Globalization (an ill-defined term) simply means anarchy.
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Steve Nash and Albert Pujols
Nash, the defending MVP of the NBA, was from Canada. Albert Pujols, the defending National league MVP of the MLB, was from Dominican Republic. What does that tell you? Tons of sports players are on H1-Bs, too. Don't you know when you're cheering for your team?
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Agian you don't make any sense.
Another non-sequitor. You don't make any sense. How is this relevant? Sports is a different kind of business (and most athletes here are not on H1-B's) where most athletes operate under a different immigration status. What's your point?
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
Steve Nash and Albert Pujols
Nash, the defending MVP of the NBA, was from Canada. Albert Pujols, the defending National league MVP of the MLB, was from Dominican Republic. What does that tell you? Tons of sports players are on H1-Bs, too. Don't you know when you're cheering for your team?
Posted by joelam888 (300 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Agian you don't make any sense.
Another non-sequitor. You don't make any sense. How is this relevant? Sports is a different kind of business (and most athletes here are not on H1-B's) where most athletes operate under a different immigration status. What's your point?
Posted by jesdog (66 comments )
Link Flag
H1B are stuck to their employer for 6 years
If I were a manager, I would definitely hire an H1B over any American, hands down. Why? Because I can give him the crappiest work, I can make him work late, be lazy about when I give him requirements, etc... Because I know he will never quit. Why? Because his immigratation status is dependent on me. Most H1B's want green cards, if you switch companies, you have to start the 6 year process all over again. If you lose your job, you have to leave the country within 15 days. Why would I want to end indentured servitude when it benefits me? Just ask Craig Barrett, he'll agree.
Posted by nser (18 comments )
Reply Link Flag
You are wrong
H1B employees change jobs and they do. They are not stuck. They don't have to stick to employers till they get the green card. When they get the card they need to be employed in similar position (job).

I wonder if you really are an employer!!! If you anyone with H1B feels stuck to you, then you have hired a moron who doesn't know how to find a job.
Posted by Tanjore (322 comments )
Link Flag
No they are not
As a former H1B worker, now a green card holder, I can say H1B workers are not stuck with their employers.

I changed jobs 2 times during the 6 years I had the H1B visa. First time because the first job wasn't gettine me anywhere, and the second time because the company went bankrupt. I've got several friends who did the same thing. Granted it's a lot harder to do than if you're a citizen or a permanent resident, but you're definitely not stuck with the same employer for 3 or 6 years.

H1B transfers, e.g. changing jobs with an existing H1B visa, are not subject to the H1B quotas discussed in this article. H1B renewals (each H1B visa is valid for 3 years) are also not subject to the same quotas.
Posted by tppp (5 comments )
Link Flag
H1B are stuck to their employer for 6 years
If I were a manager, I would definitely hire an H1B over any American, hands down. Why? Because I can give him the crappiest work, I can make him work late, be lazy about when I give him requirements, etc... Because I know he will never quit. Why? Because his immigratation status is dependent on me. Most H1B's want green cards, if you switch companies, you have to start the 6 year process all over again. If you lose your job, you have to leave the country within 15 days. Why would I want to end indentured servitude when it benefits me? Just ask Craig Barrett, he'll agree.
Posted by nser (18 comments )
Reply Link Flag
You are wrong
H1B employees change jobs and they do. They are not stuck. They don't have to stick to employers till they get the green card. When they get the card they need to be employed in similar position (job).

I wonder if you really are an employer!!! If you anyone with H1B feels stuck to you, then you have hired a moron who doesn't know how to find a job.
Posted by Tanjore (322 comments )
Link Flag
No they are not
As a former H1B worker, now a green card holder, I can say H1B workers are not stuck with their employers.

I changed jobs 2 times during the 6 years I had the H1B visa. First time because the first job wasn't gettine me anywhere, and the second time because the company went bankrupt. I've got several friends who did the same thing. Granted it's a lot harder to do than if you're a citizen or a permanent resident, but you're definitely not stuck with the same employer for 3 or 6 years.

H1B transfers, e.g. changing jobs with an existing H1B visa, are not subject to the H1B quotas discussed in this article. H1B renewals (each H1B visa is valid for 3 years) are also not subject to the same quotas.
Posted by tppp (5 comments )
Link Flag
Open your eyes people !!!
I'm not stupid!
He who has the most "persuasion", ie :cash: gets the best deal. In a low key Oligarky none of us has the time or money to stand up against this obvious and devious manipulation of the senate and congress with big money and personal gains.
When oil cost more and the president is oil oriented in business and close relationships and no one dare mention it in defiance then the whole system is rotten. Get like the French and make noise! I'm sure we are only letting the fox rule the roost. Big money big power huge public losses.
Posted by Domestech (8 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Open your eyes people !!!
I'm not stupid!
He who has the most "persuasion", ie :cash: gets the best deal. In a low key Oligarky none of us has the time or money to stand up against this obvious and devious manipulation of the senate and congress with big money and personal gains.
When oil cost more and the president is oil oriented in business and close relationships and no one dare mention it in defiance then the whole system is rotten. Get like the French and make noise! I'm sure we are only letting the fox rule the roost. Big money big power huge public losses.
Posted by Domestech (8 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Bzzzt!
Its called cheap labor.
What have you been smoking?
Posted by dargon19888 (412 comments )
Reply Link Flag
 

Join the conversation

Add your comment

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Click here to review our Terms of Use.

What's Hot

Discussions

Shared

RSS Feeds

Add headlines from CNET News to your homepage or feedreader.