December 13, 2000 1:00 PM PST

Election decision prompts voter turnout online

News that Vice President Al Gore may bring an end to the protracted fight for the White House drew mixed reaction Wednesday from voters, who quickly turned to the Internet to unleash their opinions.

As expected, Democratic voters griped on the message boards in obvious disappointment, while Republicans boldly and haughtily proclaimed victory.

"Gore, go away," one person wrote on CNN.com. "The GOP now controls the Presidency, the House, the Senate and the U.S. Supreme Court. Next time Dems select better candidates and maybe we won't kick your butts so badly."

The Internet has played a pivotal role in the days after the election. News sites experienced surges in traffic from voters rushing to get the latest details on the battle for the presidency. A few people even fired up their own Web sites to let off some steam.

But the battle may be coming to a close. The U.S. Supreme Court issued a complicated ruling late Tuesday that seemed to give Texas Gov. George W. Bush the green light to declare himself president.

The high court voted 7-2 to overturn a Florida Supreme Court ruling that allowed recounts of disputed votes in the state. The recounts were crucial for Gore's fight for the presidency.

After the decision, Gore called off the recount effort, thanked his team of lawyers, and began planning to deliver a concession speech Wednesday at 6 p.m. PST. Bush is scheduled to give his talk an hour later.

"This is an injustice," a Gore supporter wrote on CNN.com.

Another person on LATimes.com, the Los Angeles Times' Web site, posted a cartoon of a smiling Dick Cheney waving a puppet of Bush, which was flashing the peace sign.

The Gore camp did not update its official site, AlGore2000.com, giving no hints of what he will say in his speech.

 

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