October 4, 2005 8:30 PM PDT

E-voting report could push audit trails

An election commission headed by former President Jimmy Carter and former secretary of state James A. Baker III drew attention last month by proposing that voters be outfitted with national identification cards.

But a less-noticed recommendation could accelerate reform efforts in state legislatures: Improving the security of electronic voting machines by outfitting them with a voter-verifiable paper audit trail.

That would "increase citizens' confidence that their vote will be counted accurately," permit a recount should one prove necessary, and allow a random selection of electronic voting machines to be tested for accuracy, the commission's final report concludes.

No such uniform requirement currently exists, which gave rise to questions about the security and reliability of electronic voting machines in the 2004 election. Electronic voting machines, which tallied about one-third of the votes in last year's presidential contest, displayed a smattering of irregularities that Democrats used to cast doubt on the procedures used in Ohio that led to President Bush's re-election.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., warned at the time that "malfunctioning electronic machines that may not have paper receipts" can cause an "additional loss of confidence by the public." Electronic voting machines became widespread as a result of the 2000 election debacle, which Congress responded to by spending some $650 million to upgrade voting machines--without setting any requirements for a paper trail.

The Carter-Baker commission's report is likely to fuel efforts by state and federal politicians to mandate some form of audit trails. Without such audit trails, many security researchers have warned, e-voting machines are vulnerable to a slew of problems including software glitches, viruses and malicious programming.

Politicians in New York, New Jersey and Oregon recently have enacted laws mandating various forms of paper records that can be viewed by voters but not removed from the polling place--bringing the total number of states with similar rules to at least 18, according to figures compiled by Electionline.org. (Ohio enacted such a law last year but it does not take effect until January 2006.)

The Association for Computing Machinery, the professional organization for computer scientists, applauded the commission's call for voter-verified audit trails, calling it a "crucial component for sound, trustworthy voting systems."

Bev Harris, an activist who edits BlackBoxVoting.org, was more critical. Harris responded with a critique saying that the commission's recommendations are too vague and don't delve deeply enough into the many ways that e-voting machines can be compromised.

Early this year, at least four proposals were introduced in the U.S. Congress that would amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 by requiring some form of hard copy or verifiable paper ballots. Each is still bottled up in committee.

The commission also recommended that voting machine makers have a "legitimate" reason to keep their source code proprietary. Worries about backdoors could be eased by placing the source code in escrow with the government and making it available to select researchers, the panel members said.

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So we get 'monkey boy'....
"about one-third of the votes in last year's presidential contest, displayed a smattering of irregularities"

Those votes would have made difference in history, now it seems politicians in Ohio are going to jail regularly....Hmmmmm...
Posted by Vetter83 (50 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Ohio not the only place
Vast numbers of the Native American vote was stolen by the Democrats in South Dakata. It can be done with paper ballots.

How is the "paper reciept" going to work when the call for "vote from my PC" arrives?
Posted by Too Old For IT (351 comments )
Link Flag
Hello
All this boring government talk. Who talks about love anymore?
Posted by Alligata (2 comments )
Link Flag
So we get 'monkey boy'....
"about one-third of the votes in last year's presidential contest, displayed a smattering of irregularities"

Those votes would have made difference in history, now it seems politicians in Ohio are going to jail regularly....Hmmmmm...
Posted by Vetter83 (50 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Ohio not the only place
Vast numbers of the Native American vote was stolen by the Democrats in South Dakata. It can be done with paper ballots.

How is the "paper reciept" going to work when the call for "vote from my PC" arrives?
Posted by Too Old For IT (351 comments )
Link Flag
Hello
All this boring government talk. Who talks about love anymore?
Posted by Alligata (2 comments )
Link Flag
US E-voting Elections Fraudulent
If you haven't already delved into the mystery world of flawed E-voting machines, check out www.votergate.tv to see how these highly-hackable devices were used to turn the tide in recent US elections.
Posted by UnixSystems (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
US E-voting Elections Fraudulent
If you haven't already delved into the mystery world of flawed E-voting machines, check out www.votergate.tv to see how these highly-hackable devices were used to turn the tide in recent US elections.
Posted by UnixSystems (4 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Making e-voting safe for democracy
Making e-voting safe for democracy

I think one can make e-voting safe for democracy.

The problem is authentication. The one flawless system developed for the banking and finance industry is called the single use credit card number ID that was given to EDI Secure LLLP in July 22, 2003. This proves user is the user once.

That company is building a platform to put that security behind two-factor authentication using an offline device which gives it total respect as an invulnerable defense from voter or id theft fraud which is the same in this case.

However, this ancillary use of services was recognized by it as not its main hedgehog so it licensed the development of that out to a Canadian Company Single Use Credit ID, or SUCID.

Changes in U.S. policy meaning the Buy American laws adopted by the Homeland Security folks, led SUCID to open an US partnership with U.S. past election ex-official, Herson Cabreras, and Independent, head Single Use Voter ID, or SUVID.

So what does all this mean. Well, look at it this way. A voter uses their US ID card or a company credit card as ID. Using our ID theft protection platform, we prove each voter doing e-voting only voted once.

This also proves, each voter actually swiped their own card since the device requires a PIN that only they know. As added to a number that is only be used once, flawless voting from SUVID.
Posted by (66 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Voting solution said by Mr. Alishtari is affected by company changes...
Voting solution said by Mr. Alishtari is affected by company changes...

A year ago, January 2006, EDI Secure LLLP was purchased by IDPixie LLC which owns the patent US 6,598,031 B1 granted on July 22, 2003 for APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ROUTING ENCRYPTED TRANSACTION CARD IDENTIFYING DATA THROUGH A PUBLIC TELEPHONE NETWORK from inventor Jeffrey Ice. So to update EDI Secure LLLP's place in the marketplace, I add the above and below data.

My Pledge

I, Mr. Abdul Tawala Ibn Ali Alishtari, pledge my Foundation to halt child slavery activities including his Global Peace Film Festival, Inc., at www.peacefilmfest.org. I pledge moral support of legal, peaceful activities and my non-profit gifts offshore, onshore and globally, primarily with philantrophy from my personal investment to help halt all fraud, violence and scams hurting innocent children, women and families so help me God.
Posted by Abdul Tawala Ibn Ali Ali (53 comments )
Link Flag
Making e-voting safe for democracy
Making e-voting safe for democracy

I think one can make e-voting safe for democracy.

The problem is authentication. The one flawless system developed for the banking and finance industry is called the single use credit card number ID that was given to EDI Secure LLLP in July 22, 2003. This proves user is the user once.

That company is building a platform to put that security behind two-factor authentication using an offline device which gives it total respect as an invulnerable defense from voter or id theft fraud which is the same in this case.

However, this ancillary use of services was recognized by it as not its main hedgehog so it licensed the development of that out to a Canadian Company Single Use Credit ID, or SUCID.

Changes in U.S. policy meaning the Buy American laws adopted by the Homeland Security folks, led SUCID to open an US partnership with U.S. past election ex-official, Herson Cabreras, and Independent, head Single Use Voter ID, or SUVID.

So what does all this mean. Well, look at it this way. A voter uses their US ID card or a company credit card as ID. Using our ID theft protection platform, we prove each voter doing e-voting only voted once.

This also proves, each voter actually swiped their own card since the device requires a PIN that only they know. As added to a number that is only be used once, flawless voting from SUVID.
Posted by (66 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Voting solution said by Mr. Alishtari is affected by company changes...
Voting solution said by Mr. Alishtari is affected by company changes...

A year ago, January 2006, EDI Secure LLLP was purchased by IDPixie LLC which owns the patent US 6,598,031 B1 granted on July 22, 2003 for APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ROUTING ENCRYPTED TRANSACTION CARD IDENTIFYING DATA THROUGH A PUBLIC TELEPHONE NETWORK from inventor Jeffrey Ice. So to update EDI Secure LLLP's place in the marketplace, I add the above and below data.

My Pledge

I, Mr. Abdul Tawala Ibn Ali Alishtari, pledge my Foundation to halt child slavery activities including his Global Peace Film Festival, Inc., at www.peacefilmfest.org. I pledge moral support of legal, peaceful activities and my non-profit gifts offshore, onshore and globally, primarily with philantrophy from my personal investment to help halt all fraud, violence and scams hurting innocent children, women and families so help me God.
Posted by Abdul Tawala Ibn Ali Ali (53 comments )
Link Flag
 

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