May 16, 2010 11:06 PM PDT

At YouTube, adolescence begins at 5

Chad Hurley, YouTube's chief executive, says that professional video is drawing ever larger and more engaged audiences to the Google subsidiary, a sign that the site is growing up.
(From The New York Times)

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Sorry, but expect to see a rapid drop of users on YouTube. The reason people used it was because intrusive advertisements weren't there. Now that they are, people don't like it. change the adverts to be less intrusive or the service will eventually dwindle to "sponsor" accounts and grannies.
Posted by Michichael (723 comments )
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I agree that the ads are a bit annoying. But at least they're better than the approach Hulu took.
Posted by cometman7 (1363 comments )
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I agree as well. I too was shocked to find that several of my favorite youtube videos had ads one day.

But then again. . . some youtubers make money off of those ads. Whatever, it is a weird topic, and I can't really say what is best for youtube.
Posted by Yelonde (3236 comments )
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This was the very first YouTube Video...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNQXAC9IVRw
Posted by ndfan236-234860848592343415448 (31 comments )
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Despite what people think about the ads in YouTube, they are generally very short and unobtrusive--unlike the ads you see on Hulu.

And even legitimate companies that produce TV shows are seriously looking at YouTube, especially with the lifting of the 10-minute per clip limit. Don't be surprised that within two years all the Japanese anime companies (besides those associated with TV Tokyo, who have invested a lot in the Crunchyroll service) start posting their anime--new and old--on YouTube to effectively stop piracy, especially since YouTube now supports 720p and 1080p HD video. A lot of fansubbers might suddenly "go legit" as they become translators and subtitlers for anime originally broadcast in Japan but posted legitimately on YouTube.
Posted by SactoGuy018 (1360 comments )
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