October 19, 2006 7:16 AM PDT

Adobe releases beta of Flash for Linux

Related Stories

Adobe updates Flash Player, Flex tool

June 27, 2006
Adobe Systems has released a beta of a Flash Player 9 for Linux and said that it is working on 64-bit editions of Flash.

The final Flash Player 9 on Linux is due early next year. According to an FAQ put out by Adobe, the Linux version will support the same features as Flash on Macintosh and Windows.

The beta of Flash Player 9 for Linux, released Wednesday, supports most of the features except a full-screen mode and support for SSL (secure sockets layer) encryption.

The company declined to indicate when the final version of future 64-bit versions will be available.

People can develop applications using Adobe's Flex 2 software developer kit, and those Flash programs will run on systems using Microsoft Windows, Apple Computer's Mac OS or Linux, Adobe said.

See more CNET content tagged:
Flash Player, beta, Adobe Systems Inc., Linux, SSL

8 comments

Join the conversation!
Add your comment
Finally
Finally. It's been such a pain in the rear being stuck with flash 7 while everyone else was on 8... Especially because of all the sites that require 8 for entry even though, if you manage to trick them into letting them in, they could run fine on 7!
Posted by Nentuaby (8 comments )
Reply Link Flag
Why no SSL?
Of all the things to leave out, this is an
important feature. But more to the point, all
Linux distributions come with native SSL support
that's comparatively (vs Windows) simple to
write for/use. It seems like a silly oversight.
Posted by Zymurgist (397 comments )
Reply Link Flag
I hate Flash! Flash = annoying animated ads!
That's why I keep ActiveX disabled!
Posted by bobby_brady (765 comments )
Reply Link Flag
rofl
rofl, you block activex because of annoying animated ads?
Posted by gesslar (21 comments )
Link Flag
Adobe Needs to Port Its Entire Catalog to Linux
If Adobe ports Photoshop and Illustrator to Linux and if someone makes trivially easy the use of emulators and translators needed to run Word and Excel, it's ballgame for Windows.

Every enterprise in America will run for the exits to get out of the nightmware of having to deal with Microsoft for desktop OS licenses. (Excel still rules forever and a day.) The bigger they are, the faster they will run since being a big company running Microsoft OSes is like having the creature from the Alien movies nannying your kids.

At that point, MS will run and get its lawyers and attempt to sue Linux out of existence and, post-antitrust trial, they won't be able to get traction. At best, they'll end up deadlocked in long, grinding civil actions facing jurors that regard the company as a repulsive pariah.

Nice move, Adobe. Keep going!

Roberto
Posted by Sumatra-Bosch (526 comments )
Reply Link Flag
codeweavers & Wine
First of all, if you have the Adobe photoshop installer for Windows, you can install it in Linux using Wine.

also, checkout www.codeweavers.com to port MS Office
Posted by Hardrada (359 comments )
Link Flag
To catch less than 2% of the market? LOL, keep waiting.
The very fact that people would need emulators and translators to run Word and Excel (and not only) when they can easily run both plus most software available for computers in a continuously evolving in terms of security and performance OS (AKA Windows) makes that "ballgame for Windows" a pure dream (for some like you, at least) that probably will never happen. You say enterprises would run for the exits to get out of the nightmare of having to deal with Microsoft for desktop OS licenses, well first, they can do that already, nobody forces enterprises to buy Windows computers, why don't they buy Macs, hm? Secondly, what would they do when they would need assistance? Ask the Linux fanboys community? Against what you say, Microsoft is having a closer and friendlier approach regarding Linux. At worst (and considering something catastrophic), they will end up with 75% of the OS market, and continue to be the incontested market leaders. It certainly won't be Flash support in Linux (which is nothing new) that will make enterprises switch, lol, and this is even as far as they go regarding Linux support.
Posted by Ryo Hazuki (378 comments )
Link Flag
 

Join the conversation

Add your comment

The posting of advertisements, profanity, or personal attacks is prohibited. Click here to review our Terms of Use.

What's Hot

Discussions

Shared

RSS Feeds

Add headlines from CNET News to your homepage or feedreader.